Tag Archives: pentax 645

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 28 – The K-Team

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Pentax, the name that is always linked with the student special K1000, however, Pentax had a broad range of fantastic cameras, and for this episode, the gang takes a look at their shelves to discover the hidden gems that they have from the Pentax line.

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Pentax Spotmatic SP F – While not the original Pentax SLR, it certain is a big step forward with automatic lenses and TTL metering. A worthy camera for any manual shooter plue the Super-Takumar lenses have a fantastic repuation not to mention a plethora of M42 lenses will let this camera sing.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 28 - The K-Team

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: Spotmatic SP F
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, M42 Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1973

Classic Camera Revival Spotmatic F
Pentax Spotmatic F – SMC Takumar 50mm ƒ/1.4 – Tri-X400 @ ASA-1600 – HC-110 Dil. B – 11:00 @ 20C @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival Spotmatic F
Pentax Spotmatic F – SMC Takumar 50mm ƒ/1.4 – Tri-X400 @ ASA-1600 – HC-110 Dil. B – 11:00 @ 20C @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival Spotmatic F
Pentax Spotmatic F – SMC Takumar 50mm ƒ/1.4 – Tri-X400 @ ASA-1600 – HC-110 Dil. B – 11:00 @ 20C @ 20C

Pentax KX – While it doesn’t get the same level of press as the K1000, the KX is still a solid choice when it comes to K-Mount cameras and as Bill says it won’t let you down and won’t break the bank!

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 28 - The K-Team

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: KX
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Pentax K-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1975–1977

The Outside Glen Morris Ruins_
Pentax KX – SMC Pentax 28mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

VW Van_
Pentax KX – SMC Pentax 28mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

The Iron Metcalfe St. Bridge_
Pentax KX – SMC Pentax 28mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

Pentax ME – Don’t let this camera’s small size fool you, a solid addition to the Pentax line of cameras if semi-automatic and fully automatic functionality is something you look for in a camera.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 28 - The K-Team

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: ME
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Pentax K-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1977-1979


Pentax ME – SMC Pentax 50mm 1:1.7 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 6:00 @ 20C

Toronto Film Shooters Meet - October 2013
Pentax ME Super – SMC Pentax M 50mm 1:2 (Yellow Filter) – ORWO NP55 @ ASA-50 – HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

Toronto Film Shooters Meet - October 2013
Pentax ME Super – SMC Pentax M 50mm 1:2 (Yellow Filter) – ORWO NP55 @ ASA-50 – HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

Pentax 645 – A strong workhorse camera and the main medium format kit in Alex’s bag. It’s almost a point-and-shoot medium format camera and being an underdog doesn’t command as high a price point as its cousins from Mamyia and Contax do. If you do get one, go for the original and be sure to add the 35mm wide angle lens to your kit and watch out that you get the 120 insert.

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: 645
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium Format, 120/220, 6×4.5cm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Pentax K645-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1984-1997

City Methodist - Gary, IN
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (TXP) @ ASA-250 – PMK Pyro (1+2+100) 10:30 @ 24C

2013 Christmas Cards - Roll 3 Finalists
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Rollei Infrared @ ISO-25 – Blazinal 1+50 12:00 @ 20C

MCC - Classic Car Shoot
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 75mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tmax 100 (100TMX) – Kodak Tmax Developer (1+4) 7:30 @ 20C

Pentax 67II – This camera will pump you up! The Pentax 67II is the final entry in a long line of 6×7 medium format cameras from Pentax. For James it is better suited for studio work as you do feel it after a long day of shooting it in the field.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 28 - The K-Team

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: 67II
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium Format, 120/220, 6x7cm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K67-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1998

Wagon Wheel 1
Pentax 67 – Super-Takumar 6×7 105mm 1:2.4 – Kodak TMax 400

By Lake Ontario
Pentax 67 – Super-Takumar 6×7 200mm 1:4 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:00 @ 20C

Guildwood in February
Pentax 67 – Super-Takumar 6×7 55mm 1:3.5 – Fuji Neopan Acros 100 @ ASA-80 – Rodinal (1+50) 13:30 @ 20C

New Film: Cinestill 800T in 120
Bill Smith recently had the chance to take a test run with the latest offering from Cinestill, their 800T film in 120. For those who don’t know Cinestill releases a line of film that is Kodak Vision3 motion picture film but during their rolling process removes the Remjet layer leaving a regular C-41 film. Now you can easily remove the Remjet layer in home processing or send it away to a couple of labs around the USA that do the ECN-2 process. You can even do a home ECN-2 process, but with Cinestill film, you don’t have to worry about all that.

Bru
Mamiya C220F – Mamiya-Sekor 80mm 1:2.8 – Cinestill 800T Alpha

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Mamiya C220F – Mamiya-Sekor 80mm 1:2.8 – Cinestill 800T Alpha

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Mamiya C220F – Mamiya-Sekor 80mm 1:2.8 – Cinestill 800T Alpha

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 11 – The Challenge

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We love our own cameras so for the most part will bring something we’re used to or have some experience with to the table for the past episodes. So for November we’re switching it up, throwing a wrench in the works…we’re doing a mystery camera challenge! That’s right each host has selected a camera from their collection (to make things fair/easy the only criteria was that it had to be a 120 camera, and we all used the same film Rollei RPX xxx) and not told anyone else, then we each pull a name from a hat and use that person’s camera.

Cameras featured on Today’s Show…

Pentax 645
One of the under-dog cameras in the 6×4.5 lineup, the Pentax 645 was not a system camera like the Mamyia but is a solid workhorse of a camera and is Alex’s Medium Format ‘snap-shot’ camera, which is why he chose to bring this camera to the table. But it wasn’t Alex shooting the camera, that honour went to Donna who loved the camera and really wants to steal it from Alex in his sleep.

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: 645
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium Format (120/220) 6×4.5
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K645 Mount
  • Year(s) of Manufacture: 1984

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 11 - The Mystery Camera Challenge

Old Rail Road Track in Milton
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (Stock) 8:00 @ 20C

donna - p645 - rpx 100 - 014
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (Stock) 8:00 @ 20C

Mamyia Universal
Designed as a smaller form-factor press camera to get away from the bulky 4×5 press cameras the Mamyia Universal was one of the final iterations of the Mamyia Press line. Designed to be a full out system camera with interchangeable format backs, interchangeable lenses and an action grip. Mike really enjoyed the camera especially with the action grip and massive 6×9 back.

  • Make: Mamyia
  • Model: Universal
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: Medium Format, Multiple (Back Dependent)
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Mamyia Breach Lock
  • Year(s) of Manufacture: 1969

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 11 - The Mystery Camera Challenge

Mill Pond - Mamiya Universal Press
Mamyia Universal – Mamyia-Sekor 1:3.5 f=90mm – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (Stock) 8:00 @ 20C

Mill Pond - Mamiya Universal Press
Mamyia Universal – Mamyia-Sekor 1:3.5 f=90mm – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (Stock) 8:00 @ 20C

Lubitel 2
Alex was the proud user of Donna’s Lubitel 2, this Russian TLR is a favourite among film shooters as it’s just plain awesome considering it is a Soviet Camera. And for Alex a bit of nostalga as his first TLR experience was with the Lubitel 2. Cheap, well made, and a fantastic lens this is a great camera to introduce someone to the wonders of TLR photography.

  • Make: Lomo
  • Model: Lubitel 2
  • Type: Twin Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium Format, 120, 6×6
  • Lens: Fixed, Lomo T-22 75mm f/4.5
  • Year(s) of Manufacture: 1954-1980

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 11 - The Mystery Camera Challenge

Classic Camera Revival - Mystery Camera Challenge
Lomo Lubitel 2 – Lomo T-22 4,5/75 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (Stock) 8:00 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival - Mystery Camera Challenge
Lomo Lubitel 2 – Lomo T-22 4,5/75 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (Stock) 8:00 @ 20C

Kodak Medalist
Sadly the camera that John had picked out for the Mystery Camera Challenge was a Ricoh Diacord, which had some issues in the cold wet weather during the shooting day so it was a DOAcord. But that didn’t stop John, he had his fresh from the repair shop Kodak Medalist. This bulky camera shoots huge 6×9 negatives and was a favourite of the US Navy.

  • Make: Kodak
  • Model: Medalist
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: Medium Format, 620, 6×9
  • Lens: Kodak Ektar 100mm f/3.5
  • Year(s) of Manufacture: 1941

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 11 - The Mystery Camera Challenge

Stream
Kodak Medalist I – 100mm/3.5 Ektar lens – Rollei Retro 400s – Rodinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

Tree Reflection
Kodak Medalist I – 100mm/3.5 Ektar lens – Rollei Retro 400s – Rodinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

And to end off the show we have a special interview with Jacques Brodeur of Argentix.ca a wonderful photo supply shop out of Quebec and currently the only Canadian source for colour film developing chemistry!

And a special thanks to Knox Presbyterian Church Milton for letting us record at their facilities for this episode!

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario, if you’re on the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 11 – Pentax 645

While generally an underdog camera in the 6×4.5 market, the Pentax 645 is by far my favourite of all the cameras within the line. Probably because you don’t see many of them kicking around. I know of only three other photographers in my area that use the camera. But unlike its contemporaries this wasn’t a system camera. You got the body and that was it there was little you could do. But because of that you got a camera that had a built in light meter, motordrive, and grip. Plus the backing of some fantastic optics!

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645
While a bit bulky the Pentax 645 is a well rounded medium format SLR.

The Dirt
Maker: Pentax
Model: 645
Type: Medium Format (120/220) Single Lens Reflex, 6×4.5
Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K-Mount (645)
Year of Manufacture: 1984

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

The Good
This is a clean and easy to use camera, and it’s ready to go in all modes right out of the box. And it’s a workhorse. The built in grip, eye-level finder, and drive make it the perfect camera for weddings, photojournalism, or even generally carry around. I often describe it as my point-and-shoot medium format camera. Another nice feature on this camera is the dual tripod sockets. This means that when the camera is being used with a tripod you can easily switch from landscape to portrait mode by moving the camera rather than adjusting the tripod. Power for the camera comes from six AA batteries, which again seems like a lot but it also means you can get batteries for it pretty much anywhere in the world. And finally the line of lenses avalible for the camera is excellent, my personal favourite is the 35mm f/3.5 probably one of the best medium format ultra-wide lenses out there with zero distortion! Plus all the old manual focus lenses will work with the newer autofocus models (645n and 645nII).

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

The Bad
Probably the one thing that makes this camera an underdog is unlike the Maymia, Bronica, and Contax systems the Pentax 645 is not a system camera, what you get in the box is your camera. You can’t remove the eye-level finder, grip, or drive. The film is held in inserts rather than magazines so even swapping between rolls is impossible. The size/shape of the camera does make it an awkward camera to pack in a standard or smaller camera bag or backpack. While the average photographer may not need this, the camera only has a 1/60″ flash sync speed so working with strobes may be difficult as well.

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

The Low Down
If you’re looking for an easy way to get into medium format photography some will suggest the Mamyia m645 system, which is a great camera (and I’ll probably review one later on in this series) but for someone who needs a little helping hand, the Pentax 645 is great, any model. While the 645 is limited to a center-weighted meter, the 645n and nII bring in a great matrix (average) metering system which is (according to those who’ve used it) on par with the meter in the Nikon F4. Plus being an underdog camera you can probably get a good system on the cheap and have little contest in getting it. Just make sure that you get the 120 film inserts rather than 220. You’ll really only need one.

All Photos shot in Alisa Craig and Strathroy Ontario respectivly.
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-50 – Ilford Perceptol (1+1) 13:00 @ 20C

Visual Whiplash – Venturing into Pinhole Photography

You’re probably thinking, what do I mean by Visual Whiplash? It was mentioned in a comment left on one of my recent photos posted to my photostream, where right next to each other is a 4×5 image that’s sharp, crisp, and clear…and then a pinhole photo that’s rather soft.

Pinhole Test - Rising Obscura Pinhole Adapter

Visual Whiplash. I was at first a bit disappointed at these, I mean they’re not what I’m used to getting out of my trusty Pentax 645, they look like something a bit out of a toy camera. But oddly enough they’ve started to grow on me. So what got me into Pinhole photography after avoiding it for so long? My friend Wu has been talking about building a pinhole camera for a while, and the mention that worldwide pinhole photography day is coming up on the 27th this month. I thought, hey why not give it a go. My original plan was to build a pinhole board for my 4×5 camera, and sadly I won’t be able to gather the materials together in time to make that happen (but it will), so in a recent trip to my usual camera store, Burlington Camera they happened to have a new product in stock.

Pinhole Test - Rising Obscura Pinhole Adapter

The product is by Rising, a Korean company, the Obscura Adapter, it is a highly modified body cap for your camera with a laser drilled pinhole in an alumnium lug. And they make these for almost every camera and mount out there. Pentax 645, Pentax 67, Pentax K, Hassleblad, Micro 4/3, Nikon F, Canon FD, Canon EOS. And the best part is that they work on digital and film! It’s a cheap, easy way to get into pinhole photography.

Pinhole Test - Rising Obscura Pinhole Adapter

Final say, these little things are a great way to get started in pinhole photography without spending too much time getting the camera itself made. It’s not that I’m saying don’t, I mean if you want to go for it! These nice adapters are a nice easy way to get started, like me, in the craft. It’s just another tool in my camera bag. Can’t way to try it out some more!

Pentax 645 – Rising Obscura Adapter (f/180) – Efke R50
Kodak Xtol (1+1) 10:00 @ 20C

Project:1812 – Battle of the Thames

The outlook for General Henry Procter in the west was grim at best, hopeless at the worst. On September 10th, 1813 Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry had managed to take on the British Royal Navy Squadron on Lake Erie and capture all the ships intact, finally wresting control of Lake Erie from the mighty Royal Navy, this left the door wide open for a full out invasion of Upper Canada in the West. We have met the enemy and they are ours, Hazard penned in a dispatch to General William Henry Harrison who was waiting in the south. Harrison took this as an open invitation. Procter had failed to keep Harrison’s army at bay by engaging him in May at Fort Meigs, and again at Meigs in June, and Fort Stephenson in August. With his supply line from the lake effectively cut off he faced the growing threat of starvation. He had already begun the preparation for a full out retreat before the American victory on Lake Erie. The Shawnee chief Tecumseh was less than impressed at the notion of retreat calling Procter a fat animal that tucks its tail between its legs and runs when attacked.

Project:1812 - Battle of the Thames
A farm that the American column camped at during their march to catch up with Procter’s column.

Harrison began marching north in September, using Perry’s Squadron as transports quickly rolled over British forces in Michigan territory and liberating Fort Detroit. Procter departed from Fort Amhurstburg on the 27th of September after destroying the Navy Yard and the fort, destroying any supplies that could not be carried. 900 troops of the 41st regiment and 500 warriors under a reluctant Tecumseh set out for Burlington Heights. Much of the supplies were sent ahead on bateaux along the River Thames. On half rations and uninspired leadership of Procter, the troops were quickly demoralized, and the officers began to question Procter’s leadership ability. The general was sloppy, leaving roads unobstructed and bridges intact as they worked their way east. Procter himself was absent for much of the retreat, choosing to stay close to his wife and baggage leaving command to his second, Colonel Augustus Warburton, who refused to question Procter’s commands despite urgings from the other subordinate officers. Harrison instead of pushing a pursuit chose instead to secure Amhurstburg and Sandwhich first before leading the column against the British force on the retreat, finally departing on the 2nd of October at the lead of near 3,000 troops from the 27th US Infantry and a large number of Kentucky militia both mounted and infantry troops.

Project:1812 - Battle of the Thames
Along the River Thames

Procter promised to stand and fight to the natives in order to appeal to their spoiling for a fight, choosing the forks of the Thames in present day Chatham. However upon their arrival on the 4th Procter agreed that it wasn’t defensible enough and ordered the retreat to continue. By this point the Americans had managed to capture the bateaux carrying much of the British supplies, and were closing in. A group of warriors stayed behind at the forks, destroying the bridge over McGregor’s Creek and engaging the forward guard of the American column, killing three and wounding six others. However their actions did little to slow Harrison’s column and they returned to the main body of British and Native troops.

Project:1812 - Battle of the Thames
The Forks of the Thames as they are today, part of Tecumseh Park in downtown Chatham

On the morning of the 5th Procter ordered another half-mile retreat east, the tired and demoralized British troops left their half-cooked breakfast to follow their orders, it was here that Procter would make his stand, the plan was to force Harrison off the road with fire from his single six-pound gun and force his opposite to fight against the river. However he lacked the ammunition for the gun, it had been on the bateaux which had been captured. Procter also did not order the construction of field fortifications to provide cover for his men. The British troops formed a rough line of battle to stand against Harrison’s army, Tecumseh’s warriors took to the right flank of the regulars hiding themselves in a swamp. The Shawnee chief himself rode down to the line, shaking the hand of each man before joining his warriors. Harrison ordered Kentucky mounted troops to charge the British line, hoping it would break them. The troops under Lieutenant Colonel James Johnson (brother of Colonel Richard Johnson) charged the British line. The tired and beaten troops managed to fire a single raged volley into the charge, before 250 troops including General Procter ran for their lives, leaving close to 600 British troops left to surrender. Tecumseh and his warriors would not give up so quickly, giving flanking fire to the American troops, Harrison ordered Colonel Richard Johnson to take the remaining mounted militia to engage them. Their initial charge was forced back by native musket fire, Johnson himself being hit several times. Being bogged down in the swamp they went hand-to-hand with the natives. The skirmish was brief and bloody, Tecumseh himself killed (historians are unsure who killed the chief, the two that are agreed upon as being the possible man is Colonel Johnson or William Whitly), Wyandot chief Roundhead was also killed in the action. The death was catastrophic to the natives, and facing the full force of Harrison’s army retreated in disarray. American troops would continue to persue, burning the native settlement of Moraviantown, populated by Christian natives who had not participated in the war at all.

Project:1812 - Battle of the Thames
Two historic markers sit at the battlefield today, one has English and French, the other written in the native tongue that Tecumseh would’ve spoken.

While Procter eventually rallied the remaining troops at the Grand River and would eventually make it back to Burlington Heights, the consequences of his actions would be felt for the rest of the war. The native confederacy fell apart, and many tribes pulled away from the fighting, leaving only the British Regulars and local militias to stand and fight. The Americans had regained all of the Northwest, however never took advantage of it, constructing Fort Malden on the sight of the old Fort Amhurstburg, but never sent out more than raiding parties into the western part of Upper Canada. The British never attempted to take back the territory until after the war was done. The west remained quiet for the remainder of the war, save for small skirmishes in 1814. Harrison was declared a national hero, and his popularity sent him all the way to the presidency. Colonel Richard Johnson would promote the fact that he was the one that killed Tecumseh which saw him elected to the role of Vice President under Martin Van Buren. Procter’s fate however was not as prestigious, he was brought before a court martial, and charged with negligence and improper conduct. Suspended of Rank and pay for six month the charge effectively ending his military career.

Project:1812 - Battle of the Thames
The battlefield as it sits today is mostly farmers fields, however in October of last year it was filled with people and reenactors to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the battle to the day.

The defeat of the British at the Thames had consequences that stretch well into today, the members of Canada’s native community continue to be marginalized by the government, their land reduced to mere reserves, many in poor condition. The plight of the American natives was far worse being forces well off their homelands by Federal troops through the rest of the 19th century. I don’t often get political in these posts, but this is one negative result of the war of 1812, and brings up the question, what would have happened if Brock and Tecumseh had survived the war? Would we have seen a free native confederacy independent of rule by the whites? Or would it have just delayed the inevitable expulsion?

Project:1812 - Battle of the Thames
Marking the entrance to the Tecumseh Parkway

You can still see the battlefield today, located on old Highway 2 just outside of Chatham. Two historic plaques mark the site, one in English and French, the second written in the language of Tecumseh. There is also a memorial to the Shawnee chief. A little further up Highway 2 is the Fairfield museum that sits on the former site of the Moraviantown settlement. Moraviantown was rebuild on the opposing side of the River Thames. Also if you have a free afternoon, the local historical societies have banded together and setup the Tecumseh parkway which traces the historical route of the retreat along the river with stops along the way important to the battle. This past October I had the honour of participating in a reenactment of the Battle of the Thames, one of the joys of being an 1812 reenactor is that is gives me some insight into what actually happened during these engagements, and while we aren’t really British soldiers we do seek to portray them as best we can, and to honour those men (and women) who actually fought and died on these fields of battle 200 years.

Photos: Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 (400TX) @ ASA-200 – HC-110 Dil. E 6:30 @ 20C

Sources:
Guidebook to the Historic Sites of the War of 1812 Second Edition by Gilbert Collins – 2006 The Dundurn Group Publishers
Web: www.eighteentwelve.ca/?q=eng/Topic/29
Web: militaryhistory.about.com/od/warof1812/p/War-Of-1812-Battle-Of-The-Thames.htm
Web: ckwarof1812.weebly.com/skirmish-at-the-forks.html

Project:1812 – Oliver Hazard Perry

Oliver Hazard Perry, one of the great American Heroes that made his name in the War of 1812. A navy man through and through and the man who beat the Royal Navy at their own game. Born in August 23rd, 1785 in South Kingston, Rhode Island entered the fledgling United States Navy at age 15 as a mid-shipman. He saw his first action during the First Barbary war in Tripoli under Commodore Preble. By 1802 he was promoted to Lieutenant and offered the post of master and commander of the Schooner Revenge with Commodore John Roger’s squadron. As it was a time of peace, Perry was given the task of surveying the harbors along the coast of Rhode Island. During the survey the Revenge was wreaked on a reef, the court marshal found Perry not at fault for the wreak of the Revenge, in fact his actions both saved the life of his crew and civilian property. Perry was granted an extended leave, giving him the opportunity to marry Elizabeth Champlain Mason on May 5th 1811. They were to have five children together.

Project:1812 - Oliver Hazard Perry
A statue to Oliver Hazard Perry in downtown Erie, PA

Perry returned to the service on May 1812, a month before war was declared against England. He was promoted to the rank of Commander and given command of a group of gunboats tasked with the defense of Rhode Island’s coast. The command soon lost interest to Perry who petitioned for a transfer to the Great Lakes or the high seas. His request was granted and he reported to Commodore Chauncey in Sacket’s Harbor in February of 1813. Chauncey recognizing Perry’s skill kept him on Lake Ontario for two weeks before transferring him to Lake Erie to take command of the new squadron being constructed there. Perry’s first task was to actually build the squadron. Presque Isle was the new US Navy base on Lake Erie. Despite the setbacks in lack of supplies and manpower, Perry managed to get his new squadron built. By July 1813 he had a squadron of six ships. His flagship the USS Lawrence, her sister ship the USS Niagara, the Tigress, Ariel, Porcupine, and the Scorpion. Perry arranged for the USS Somers, Ohio, and Caledonia to join them after a daring rescue from the Black Rock Naval base near Buffalo.

Project:1812 - La Presque Isle
Perry’s Monument at La Presque Isle

With his squadron built, Perry set out for his greatest victory of his career. With the British pulling back their blockade, Perry sailed from Presque Isle on September 1813 for training maneuvers on the lake. On the 10th of the month Perry’s squadron engaged the British squadron off Put-In-Bay. The Lawrence soon smashed through the British Squadron, itself receiving major damage, Perry, carrying his battle Flag emblazed with the famous phrase “Don’t Give Up the Ship” transferred Command to the USS Niagara which had held back during the engagement. With the British squadron floundering, took the remaining ships of his squadron in hand and forced the British to strike their colours and surrender within fifteen minutes. We have met the enemy and they are ours he penned to General William Henry Harrison on his victory over the British on Lake Erie. He had ensured the British would never have control over the lake over the rest of the war, having taking their entire squadron as a prize and opened up the west to General Harrison’s Army. Perry was regarded as a national hero, promoted to Post-Captain he was given command of the USS Java, a 44-gun frigate under construction in Baltimore. Perry stood by his ship during the failed British attack against Fort McHenry, himself ready to order the destruction of the Java should the need arise.

Project:1812 - Oliver Hazard Perry
Perry’s famous Battle Flag, yes it’s upside down, I got the building to correct it.

Perry finally sailed with the Java after the war in 1815 in the Mediterranean for the second Barbary war. The conflict was not without incident for Perry. He clashed with the commander of the marines on the Java, John Heath. During the conflict, Perry was goaded into challenge Heath to a dual, although both men were court marshaled they were released with only a reprimand, when they finally met on the field, neither men were injured, but honour was satisfied. It was at the same time that Perry and his former executive officer, Jesse Elliot, whom commanding the Niagara during the Battle of Lake Erie came into conflict with each other. Elliot challenged Perry, who responded by laying charges of conduct unbecoming of an officer in the face of the enemy. President Madison, rather than let two national heroes disgrace themselves in the public eye, gave Perry a promotion to Commodore and gave him a squadron. With command of the USS John Adams he sailed for South America in 1819. Perry was assigned with conducting high level negotiations with Simon Bolivar. Perry on the voyage home was struck with the yellow fever and passed away on August 23rd, 1819. His remains were transported and buried in Newport Island, Rhode Island. Perry’s legacy remains strong within the United States especially connected with the navy. He even has a class of guided missile frigate named after him, his battle flag “Don’t Give Up the Ship” remains a staple of pop culture even two centuries after the conflict.

Written with files from:
Guidebook to the Historic Sites of the War of 1812 Second Edition by Gilbert Collins – 2006 The Dundurn Group Publishers
Web: www.flagshipniagara.org/maritime_museum/History/battle_of_lake_erie/Commodore_Oliver_Hazard_Perry.htm
Web: militaryhistory.about.com/od/naval/p/War-Of-1812-Commodore-Oliver-Hazard-Perry.htm

Photos:
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5/SMC Pentax A 645 80-160mm 1:4.5 – Kodak Tri-X Pan
HC-110 Dil. B 5:30 @ 20C

Out of Sight

As you may know the human eye can only see a small part of the full light spectrum in the world. This is known as the visible spectrum, and it is what photography works with…mostly.

Using special films and filters you can actually photograph in the infrared spectrum. I recently came into possesion of several rolls of Infrared film, sadly not the famous Kodak HIE, but two rolls of Konica IR750, a bunch of (highly sought after) Efke IR820, a roll of (sort of infrared) Ilford SFX200, and bought some Rollei Infrared film. So I purchased a nice Kenko R72 filter big enough to screw into my 35mm lens for my Pentax 645, and the 17-55mm and 70-200mm lens for my Nikon D300. I also have a Hoya 89b filter for smaller lenses.

My first test didn’t turn out too well using some very expired Konica IR750 film…but in the February 1st podcast from the FPP I picked up a couple tips for the second roll I have. But it gave the IR effect. Black skies, white greens. I exposed the film at ISO-10 based on Internet reading, but the second roll will be exposed slower, maybe ISO-1 (like Efke films).

Infrared Fail - Jan 2013

Infrared Fail - Jan 2013

Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Konica IR750 – HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

I also slapped the filter onto my D300 and fired off and got some pretty pleasing results as well, but have to work a bit on my exposure still.

House Hunting - Jan 2013

However it was back on Monday that I got my first real taste of what can be done with Infrared film using a roll of the Rollei IR film. Now for the most part IR film is rated at 400, because adding the filter in front has such a high filter factor you have to pull the film several stops, in this case I exposed the film at ISO-25 (that’s 4 stops). I used my trusty Gossen Luna Pro F to manually meter each scene. The results, well they speak for themselves. I can’t wait to actually print some of these.

2013 Christmas Cards - Roll 3 Finalists

2013 Christmas Cards - Roll 3 Finalists

2013 Christmas Cards - Roll 3 Finalists

Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Rollei Infrared @ ISO-25 – Rodinal 1+50 12:00 @ 20C

Now I wait for spring and summer to arrive to work more in infrared, I’m also glad I can still get new stock film because I’m rather enjoying this look.

Long Live Film.

Project:1812 – Fort Amherstburg/Fort Malden

In most cases when a fort is destroyed and rebuilt it retains its old name. Fort Erie was destroyed four times over the course of its service as a military outpost and maintained its old name. Fort York continued with even when the city it once defended changed to Toronto. But in the case of Fort Amherstburg, after the destruction of this fort, when it was rebuilt it was given the name Fort Malden as it is known by today.

Project:1812 - Fort Amherstburg/Fort Malden
A bastion in the 1830s earthworks.

Fort Amherstburg was built in 1796 after the Jay Treaty forced the British to transfer control of Fort Detroit over to the American government. The simple earthworks fortification on the Upper Canada side of the Detroit River served as the central hub for British Military operations, the Provincial Marine and the King’s Navy Yards, and the British Indian Department in the Western frontier of Upper Canada. The fort had simple wooden frame buildings, and no blockhouses (and oddity in those days). Construction of the fort fell to the Royal Canadian Volunteers (a group of local citizens of Upper Canada raised as a fensible battalion). The fort was manned by members of the Royal Artillery and a detachment from the 41st Regiment of foot. Another group of British irregular soldiers, Caldwell’s Western Rangers also operated out of the fort.

Project:1812 - Fort Amherstburg/Fort Malden
The 1819 Brick Barracks, the only surviving military structure on the site.

When war broke out in 1812, the fort was General Hull’s first target when he landed his forces north of the fort in the small town of Sandwich (Today known as Windsor, ON). He marched south only to be opposed by the troops from Amherstburg, it was this engagement at the River Canard along with news that General Brock was coming with reinforcements forced Hull to retreat back to Fort Detroit. When Brock arrived it was at Fort Amherstburg the general met with Shawnee Chief Tecumseh, the two great leaders then launched their operation laying siege to Fort Detroit eventually forcing Hull’s surrender and recapturing Detroit with plans for moving further south. But in 1813 the British fared far worse in the western theater, several failed attacks and sieges forced the British to retreat, General Procter ordering the King’s Navy Yards, warehouse and Fort Amherstburg destroyed by fire leaving nothing for the quickly advancing American army, and the British pulled back along the River Thames (it was during this retreat that the Battle on the Thames occurred and saw the death of Tecumseh). The Americans soon began construction of a new fort over the charred ruins of Fort Amherstburg, calling their new smaller fortification Fort Malden. With the war focus shifting to the Niagara peninsula over the final years of the war the Fort Malden remained incomplete when the British reclaimed the region, building only a small barracks to house a small detachment of troops in 1819.

Project:1812 - Fort Amherstburg/Fort Malden
A visual representation of the 1839 No. 1 Barracks

But by the 1830s the threat of rebellion swept through the Canadas, and the British scrambled to build up their military presence, Fort Malden once again was surrounded by high earthworks and several new buildings where thrown up. The fort was garrisoned by members of the Royal Canadian Rifle Regiment, with the 34th Regiment of Foot using it as a staging area. The fort continued to serve as a military base until 1851, when it was transferred over to the local government who setup a lunatic asylum until 1871. During this time the earthworks were lowered, and trees planted over the ground, several new buildings were installed as well. After the asylum transferred to St. Catherines (where it still operates today) the fort was left and forgotten. The two larger barracks were moved elsewhere in Amherstburg, one split into three separate buildings, all of which still stand today, and the second was left intact and used as a stable until 1920 when it burned down. The grounds were slowly sold off for private ownership; the 1868 laundry/kitchen became a private residence. It was in 1937 when many of these historic sites were purchased by the federal government for restoration, Fort Malden among them. Today the Fort Malden National Historic Site contains the original 1819 barracks fully restored to what it would have looked like when it was built after the War of 1812, the 1868 building now serves as the fort’s museum. Visitors can also see the remains of the 1830s earthworks and see outlines where the other fort structures once stood.

Written with files from:
Guidebook to the Historic Sites of the War of 1812 Second Edition by Gilbert Collins – 2006 The Dundurn Group Publishers
Web: www.amherstburg.ca/Attractions/Details/fortmalden.aspx
Web: www.windsorpubliclibrary.com/digi/war1812/contents/surrender/fortmalden.htm
Web: www.windsorpubliclibrary.com/digi/war1812/contents/retreat/retreatamherstburg.htm

Photos:
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 75mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:30 @ 20C

Project:1812 – The Capture of Fort Niagara

The British were mad, and rightly so. In December of 1813 as the American’s retreated to winter quarters across the Niagara River they not only destroyed Fort George (Except for the powder magazine) and then at the urging of the treasonous Joseph Willcocks burned the town of Newark (Niagara-On-The-Lake) in an effort to turn the Canadian sentiment against the British rulers. This of course wasn’t the case, it made the local Canadian and British commanders turn their hatred towards the Americans.

Project:1812 - Capture of Fort Niagara
The British Launch site for the operation

When General George Drummond arrived in the Niagara region as the British retook the area he immediately ordered the retaliation for the atrocities he saw. The Americans had left the civilian population without shelter or supplies. Many had taken shelter in the ruins of Fort George or built crude shelters out of the ruins of the town. Drummond’s first goal was to take back Fort Niagara, although it was the most powerful and defendable fort in the region, after the American’s had taken the Niagara region the fort was poorly defended by a drunken commander some members of the 1st US Artillery and 24th US Infantry. The remainders of the troops at the fort were sick or recovering.

Project:1812 - The Capture of Fort Niagara
The brigade landed several miles south of the Fort so that the pickets wouldn’t see the boats on the river.

On December 18th, 1813 Colonel John Murray lead a force of 562 British regulars across the Niagara River. Troops from the 1st Royal Scots Grenadiers, the 41st Regiment of Foot’s Light and Grenadier companies, and the 100th of Foot with members of the Lincoln Militia acting as guides and boatmen struck out under the cover of darkness from Upper Canada landing a few miles from the Fort. Drummond had made it clear to Colonel Murray that he did not want a long siege against Niagara, but a quick strike to take it back by surprise. Murray ordered the troops to remove their flints to prevent any accidental discharges. The American pickets were too busy keeping warm than actually watching for troops and were quickly overcome, surrendering the password the brigade made quick work of the other pickets without raising the alarm.

Project:1812 - The Salt Battery
The Salt battery, part of the American defense along the river.

As the British approached the fort, they answered the challenge with the correct password and putting on a fake accent; they quickly took the gatehouse and opened the gate to the rest of the forces before the alarm had been raised. But it was already too late; Colonel Murray’s Brigade was inside and making quick work of the fort’s defenders. American troops managed to barricade themselves inside the south redoubt refusing to comply with the surrender order. They held off for several hours before the British forced their way inside and the order was given to bayonet the men inside.

Project:1812 - Fort Niagara
The main gatehouse at Fort Niagara

Fort Niagara once again flew the Union Jack, and remained under the flag for the rest of the war. Steel and surprise had taken the fort giving the British again a foothold in the US; from there they struck out and continued on their mission of revenge of the burnings of 1813 by burning everything from Fort Niagara to Buffalo. The capture of Fort Niagara cost the British five men, and six wounded. The Americans lost sixty-five men, another six wounded, and took four hundred prisoners. The British also seized seven hundred muskets, and various clothing items including much needed shoes.

Written with Files from:
Guidebook to the Historic Sites of the War of 1812 Second Edition by Gilbert Collins – 2006 The Dundurn Group Publishers
Web: www.eighteentwelve.ca/?q=eng/Topic/42
Web: war1812.tripod.com/ftniagara.html

Photos:
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Efke KB50 – Blazinal 1+50 9:00 @ 20C
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – HC-110 Dil. B 7:30 @ 20C

Project:1812 – Fort Niagara

Situated with commanding view of the mouth of the Niagara River, Fort Niagara has stood guard over the area for over three hundred years. It remains some of the oldest buildings in the upstate New York area. It has survived two wars, one siege, and has changed hands five times over its service. Today the old fort sits on state lands with sports fields and picnic areas that once served as prison camps and training grounds.

Project:1812 - Fort Niagara
The gate house which dates back to the French Period.

Project:1812 - Fort Niagara
An overview of the fort, when it was still in use, the grounds would have had many more buildings and tent lines.

The French established their first fort on the site in 1678, known then as Fort Conti served as an armed trading post and terminus of the Niagara Portage road. However a winter decimated the fort’s population and was eventually abandoned. The French returned and reestablished themselves in the area in 1687, and by 1688 the fort became the centre of the fur trade for the region. Extensive construction expanded the fort as tensions between the French and British Empires threatened to spill into North America. The Seven-Years war, or French-Indian war as it was known as in North America came to the fort in 1759 when British forces laid siege, eventually forcing the surrender of the fort in July 26, 1759. Under British control, the renamed Fort Niagara was expanded yet again.

Project:1812 - Fort Niagara
The French Castle, the oldest building on the site was built in 1729.

The Fort continued to be held by the British through the American Revolution and remained a loyalist stronghold, throughout the conflict. It served as a base of operations for Butler’s Rangers. The British continued to hold onto the fort even after the Treaty of Paris was signed. It was not until 1796 that the Jay Treaty forced the British to turn over the forts on the American side of the boarder. The United States Army took control of the fort. A relation between the troops and officers between Fort Niagara, and its opposite, Fort George was amicable, and often commanding officers would have dinner with their counterparts. That of course all stopped when war was declared in 1812, Fort Niagara and Fort George and their various batteries along the river exchanging artillery fire. The most intense exchange between the two occurred prior to the Battle of Fort George in 1813 which saw the British forces driven from the Niagara Region. But in December of 1813, following the Burning of Newark (Niagara-On-The-Lake) and York; Fort Niagara found itself under British attack and through a clever surprise attack saw the Union Jack once again flying over the Fort. After the treaty of Ghent was ratified in February of 1815 the British once again turned Fort Niagara over to the United States.

Project:1812 - Fort Niagara
A battery of “Long Nines” at Fort Niagara.

However the age of masonry forts was at an end, modern weapons, and advanced in Technology discovered through the bloody American civil war saw a much larger camp based military base expand around the old fort through the latter half of the 19th century and into the 20th century. The old French fort slowly deteriorated under the Military. Camp Niagara served the United States Army through the First World War and even the Second World War. During the Second World War a Prisoner of War camp was situated on the property also. However the locals were interested in the fate of the French fort, by 1931 the colonial fort was starting to be restored, and the grounds open to the public, and the fort was fully restored by 1934. The army continued to operate Camp Niagara through the Korean conflict and in 1963 dismantled the camp and turned the grounds over the civilian government as public land, Fort Niagara State Park was opened to the public in 1965. The US Coast Guard however maintains a detachment at the fort, giving Fort Niagara the title of longest continuously occupied Military bases in North America. Today the fort is a National Historic Site and musuem and is open to the public, they also host a reenactment of the capture of the fort on the Labour Day long weekend.

Project:1812 - Fort Niagara
The Fort Niagara Cemetary, which contains the bodies of the men & women who died at the fort, and a memorial to those losts during the attack in December of 1813

Written with files from:
Guidebook to the Historic Sites of the War of 1812 Second Edition by Gilbert Collins – 2006 The Dundurn Group Publishers
Web: oldfortniagara.org

Photos: Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 (400TX)
Dev: Kodak HC-110 Dilution B 7:30 @ 20C