What was I thinking…. If there is one negative size format that I have been actively ignoring since I started to review cameras is half-frame. And there is a good reason for this, I struggle to finish off a roll of 36-exposures. And when it comes to half-frame in the realm of 35mm, 36 exposures turns into 72-exposures on a roll, even if I got a 24-exposure roll I’m still staring down the barrel of 48-frames. But it seems that half-frame has gotten a bit of a revival with more people wanting to increase the number of shots on a roll especially with the costRead More →

It has been some time since I wrote a verse post, so it’s time I tried this again. But rather than pitting cameras against each other, I will be pitting developers against each other. The idea behind this came from my good friend James Lee, who loves to show off the power of the Fuji Acros 100 when it is slightly overexposed and developed in Ilford Perceptol. I’ve worked with this combination, and it is impressive. Recently, James has also been working with 510-Pyro. I asked myself which is better, namely when put head-to-head, Perceptol and 510-Pyro? The setup is a simple one, I haveRead More →

Writing reviews on cameras is easy; I’ve been working on those since 2015, and while the style and depth of those reviews have changed since I first started, I have also begun to include other pieces of camera kit into the cycle. One of the two newest reviews I have written is on lenses. These days, many lens reviews are out there, with most focusing on modern digital glass. Some vintage glass is starting to be reviewed online thanks to the ability to adapt these lenses to modern mirrorless cameras used in the cinematography industry. These are also the hardest reviews to write for twoRead More →

While my tastes in developers do lean towards the more exotic, something is refreshing about a standard baseline developer. In my books, that developer has always been Kodak D-76; these days, you can get the stuff in many different forms from different manufacturers. The first developer review that I wrote was on D-76 and I have since done Ilford’s version, ID-11, and Flic Film’s Classic MQ. It’s no secret that D-76 is one of the team’s favourites at the Film Photograph Project. The idea that you can get results from almost any film stock by using D-76 Stock for six minutes has been promoted byRead More →

It’s always exciting news when a new film hits the market, and it seems that the folks at FilmFerrania are certainly working hard to bring back as much B&W stocks from the original version of Ferrania as possible. Last year we saw the introduction of Orto their newest film since the initial release of P30. And earlier this year they announced the reintroduction of Ferrania P33. P33 is another classic film stock from the Italian manufacturer. With a sensitivity of 160 ASA, the P33 ensures a simpler and more versatile photographic experience compared to the past. Designed to overcome the processing and printing challenges facedRead More →

I’m still fond of lenses with a 28mm focal length, despite having other lenses (in different systems) that are wider, but sometimes all you need to get the job done is a 28mm. The Canon FD 28/2.8 fits that bill; it is essential and no-nonsense, with nothing overly interesting about the lens or optics. The FD 28/2.8 gets the job done without any fanfare. There are two versions of this lens available in Canon’s FD-Mount: the original collar-lock version (FD) and the button-lock version (FDn), which allows for easier mounting and dismounting of the lens from the camera body. After picking up the AE-1, whichRead More →

Last year, there was an explosion of new film releases from a rebirthed ORWO; while some are variants of their popular black & white motion picture stocks, they also showed off two new colour films. There is still a lot of controversy around ORWO, especially in their future and future film manufacturing capacities. This month, I’m covering one of the two colour film stocks ORWO released last year, NC500. According to the ORWO website, NC500 is based on a classic Agfa colour motion picture film stock. The same film stock used to film the 1985 film, Out of Africa. But this is a new filmRead More →

When it comes to photography the exciting things to review are cameras, lenses, films, and developers. But there are a tonne of other things that go into photography beyond the main kit. There are of course light meters, I’ve reviewed several of them in the past, both here on the blog and over on my YouTube channel. There are also flash units, but while I have flashes for all my main camera kits, I don’t use them that often, but they’re still good to have. But what about all those extra bits that don’t get the staring role, relegated to be mentioned in the background.Read More →

I first learned about the fourth generation of Minolta SLRs from the Film Photography Project and Leslie Lazenby’s promotion of the Maxxum 700si as one of the perfect autofocus SLRs ever produced. And having used one in the past, the 700si is a good camera. I used one for a few rolls before passing it along; I had yet to return to the Minolta A-Mount. Then I got a 7000, which burned and was replaced with a Maxxum 9 because why not go from one end to another? It was with the ‘9 that I got my taste for the A-Mount. But in my reviewRead More →

If there is the closest thing to a universal developer in the film photography world, that developer is Diafine. If you’re thinking, “Wait, aren’t all developers universal?” You are right; a B&W developer will develop many different film stocks. But it doesn’t often happen that two other film stocks, shot at different speeds, can be developed simultaneously. There are some examples of cross-over, but only a few. Diafine uses three main development times and a couple of unique combinations. These are shared across many different film stocks that allow you to develop multiple rolls shot multiple ways in the same tank. You can also shootRead More →