Tag Archives: Toronto

Toronto Film Shooters Meetup – Winter ’17

I never thought that this little idea of mine would catch on. I never believe that my little social ideas would go over. And yet they usually do in some form or another. For example, the Toronto Film Shooters Meetup, now starting on its the fourth year. TFSM, a quarterly gathering of photographers in the Southern Ontario region who loves to shoot traditional film based cameras is an idea I floated back in 2013. I was still an active member of the Analog Photography User Group (APUG), and in the Toronto Sub-Forum, someone was complaining that there was not enough photo walks in the Greater Toronto Region specifically for film photographers.

TFSM - Winter '17
Zeiss Ikon Contax IIIa – Zeiss Opton Sonnar 1:1,5 f=50mm – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – SPUR HRX (1+20) 9:30 @ 20C

TFSM - Winter '17
Zeiss Ikon Contax IIIa – Zeiss Opton Sonnar 1:1,5 f=50mm – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – SPUR HRX (1+20) 9:30 @ 20C

So I, a young, mid-twenty some-odd kid, piped up. I’ll organize a quarterly photo walk one for each season. So on a bright summer day in 2013, I launched the Toronto Film Shooters Meetup or TFSM. It’s had varied success over the four years; there was even an event where I was the only one in attendance. The winter ones are usually the least attended walks mostly because the weather can be rather terrible, or just plain cold. But the walk a couple of weeks back it was a bit gray, but the weather was okay.

TFSM - Winter '17
Zeiss Ikon Contax IIIa – Zeiss Opton Sonnar 1:1,5 f=50mm – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – SPUR HRX (1+20) 9:30 @ 20C

TFSM - Winter '17
Zeiss Ikon Contax IIIa – Zeiss Opton Sonnar 1:1,5 f=50mm – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – SPUR HRX (1+20) 9:30 @ 20C

The six brave souls who attended took in an icy view along Toronto’s lakeshore, which during the summer is fairly active, but not so much in the winter. And yet there was still lots to photograph along the way. Earlier in the day, I had taken my Contax IIIa through the downtown core to give the beauty of a camera a bit of a workout. A stop at Downtown Camera to stock up one some film, and even got my hands on a box of RPX400 in 4×5.

TFSM - Winter '17
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Bergger BRF400+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

TFSM - Winter '17
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Bergger BRF400+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

I’m surprised as for how well all my photos came out. Usually, I don’t post much in the way of volume from these meets. But making a choice to bring only two cameras and only actively shooting one at any given time probably helped. And I was using several new-to-me items this time around. The Nikon F2 was loaded up with Bergger BRF 400+ and an AI-S 35mm lens, while the Contax IIIa had an old favourite FP4+ but this time around I developed with SPUR HRX, a new developer that I got introduced to by Mike.

TFSM - Winter '17
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Bergger BRF400+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

TFSM - Winter '17
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Bergger BRF400+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

If you’re in the Toronto area or even beyond, we have regular attendees from Peterborough, feel free to join us on Facebook to hear about all the madness that is the Toronto Film Shooters group!

Inspiring Interpretation and Imitation

Recently in one of the many film photography groups, I’m a member of on Facebook a group admin, Reg Pritchard, put forward a challenge to interpret and imitate a famous photographer. Thankfully the photographer was not one that I knew, Robert Doisneau. Robert roamed the streets of Paris with his Leica during the 1930s, and if credited as being a pioneer, like many contemporaries, in the field of humanist photography and photojournalism. Thankfully Reg posted several examples of Robert’s work from which we could draw inspiration.


Paris Boulevard Brune Whole Family on AJS Motorcycle – Robert Doisneau, 1953

Doisneau’s photograph of a large family on a single motorbike caught my attention because that one person was looking right at the camera, there was a little touch of interaction between the subject and the photographer. It certainly is an aspect of street photography that I tend to look for, a silent confirmation that I was taking their photo. I jumped and started looking through my rather extensive collection of photographs I have online. Settling on these six.

Toronto - Dec 30th, 2015
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Eastman Double-X 5222 @ ASA-200 – Kodak DK-50 (1+1) 6:00 @ 20C

TFSM - Fall '16
Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Ilford Perceptol (1+1) 10:00 @ 20C

Toronto - July 2015
Nikon FG – AI Nikkor 135mm 1:2.8 – Eastman Double-X 5222 @ ASA-250 – PMK Pyro (1+1+100) 15:00 @ 20C

Toronto - July 2015
Nikon FG – AI Nikkor 135mm 1:2.8 – Eastman Double-X 5222 @ ASA-250 – PMK Pyro (1+1+100) 15:00 @ 20C

The Streets of Brussels
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Kodak Plus-X 125 @ ASA-125 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 7:30 @ 20C

Toronto - July 1st
Leica IIIc – Leitz Summitar f=5cm 1:2 – Kodak Plus-X 125 @ ASA-125 – HC-110 (Dil. B) 5:00 @ 20C

While it’s important to develop your own eye and style, sometimes it’s good to look at the styles of other photographers and see if you draw your inspiration from them and even sometimes duplicate them.

SPUR of the Moment

There are plenty of developers out there that I have yet to try, some because they just aren’t made anymore and others because I just cannot get them in Canada. Plus I can be a creature of habit and stick to what I know and can get the results I want. So when a fellow photographer and CCR co-host Mike Bitaxi, started talking about this new developer he was working with my interest oddly enough grabbed especially after seeing the results.

TFSM - Winter '17

TFSM - Winter '17

The developer in question is SPUR HRX. SPUR, or Speed Photography, Ultra Resolution, is a company out of Germany that I had never heard of before. HRX, despite the name, is the latest developer in the HRX line, the predecessor being HRX-3, and is designed to deliver fine grain and sharpness. To me, that sounds a lot like Pyro based developers like my favorite Pyrocat-HD.

TFSM - Winter '17

TFSM - Winter '17

There is one catch to this developer, it comes in two parts, but you don’t mix it like you would Pyrocat HD because unlike Pyro developers there is just a single dilution ratio for developing. That’s right; you have to do a lot more math with it. But let’s break it down using a natural dilution. For Ilford FP4+ at ASA/ISO-100, you use a 1:20 dilution, so when using 500mL of developer you need 24mL of developer and 476mL of water. Taking that 24mL of developer and divide in half so 12mL of Part A and 12mL of Part B. It’s when you start getting into prime numbers like 1:17 that you’re going to run into trouble. But a plastic syringe with .5mL markings will make your life easier.

TFSM - Winter '17

TFSM - Winter '17

What you get from the developer is a classic black and white image, good blacks and whites and beautiful wide mid-tones. While the pictures are sharp, the grain is nicely reduced making the film easily scannable. Now I used a film that already has a pleasing grain structure and is relatively fine-grained by its nature. Does the developer behave like Pyro? I’m not sure of that yet; I have several boxes of 4×5 film to pit head-to-head using HRX and Pyrocat-HD for a later post. But for now, I’m enjoying HRX. If you want to give the developer a try, you can pick it up from either Argentix.ca (not at the moment) or Freestyle Photographic!

All Photos Taken in Toronto, Ontario Canada
Zeiss Ikon Contax IIIa – Zeiss Opton Sonnar 1:1,5 f=50mm – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Spur HRX (1+20) 9:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 48 – Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B

There’s something to be said about the ergonomics of cameras, for the most part, they hadn’t moved beyond the box cameras that dominated the snapshot market. Even the single lens reflex cameras and rangefinder cameras were boxes. And while they weren’t too bad to hang onto for extended periods of time there had to be something better. Today we have cameras with excellent grips, but the first thing I realized when I picked up the Contaflex Super B was that it wasn’t a box, and the trapezoid shape of the body would make the camera an enjoyable one to shoot as I walked from the Junction to Koreatown. Special thanks to Mike Bitaxi for loaning out the camera for this review!

CCR Review 48 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B

The Dirt
Make: Zeiss Ikon
Model: Contaflex Super B
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 135, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Breach lock
Year of Manufacture: 1963

CCR Review 48 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B

CCR Review 48 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B

The Good
As I mentioned at the beginning this is a great camera to hold, and all the controls are right there, shutter, focus, and aperture. And the focus is easy to operate with the twin knob system. Even the safety catch on the aperture that I thought would be a bit of an issue for me turned out to be easy to operate with a push and twist while using the helper knob as well. The optics of this camera truly make it; they’re all produced by Carl Zeiss, Tessar design lenses for the most part. And the cool part is how you swap out the optics. We’re not talking about traditional lenses. All the controls for aperture, focus and shutter are right on the camera body; you are only swapping out the glass. Another interesting part of the camera is that it’s semi-automatic on the shutter priority, but the camera is also mechanical, so you don’t need the battery, but it is nice to have that as an option. While not essential for me in this test but worth mentioning is that it is a leaf shutter, so you can sync any flash at any shutter speed making it versatile when operating in low light environments. Finally, this is an easy camera to operate you can pick it up and get right to work. I only had to look up how to release the film advance to rewind the film after I finished the roll.

CCR Review 48 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B

CCR Review 48 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B

The Bad
The first thing I noticed with the camera is that there’s no automatic mirror return. The Contaflex Super B is not a camera designed for speed, as with the pull of the film advance it not only opens the shutter, but also cocks the shutter, advances the film, and returns the mirror. The result is a massive long pull on that lever. I felt like I was dragging back the cock for a flintlock musket that hadn’t been lubricated in some time. The Camera is not designed for professional jobs where you have to move quickly. The idea of only swapping out the glass is clever, the problem is that the actual mount is tiny, so it works well for the 50mm f/2.8 lens, but when you’re getting into the telephoto, it looks kind of weird. With the large front optics narrowing down to this tiny mount point. It makes the camera look like a trumpet and for me throws off the balance of the camera. I was provided with a pair of telephoto lenses, but I opted to stick with the 50mm as I found that with the longer glass I had a hard time holding the camera. While only a minor annoyance the camera’s meter relies on a Mercury battery to operate, while I was given one, I chose to leave the battery out as the door didn’t close properly and since the camera can function without it, I just stuck to Sunny-16 and the Gossen Lunasix F for metering.

CCR Review 48 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B

CCR Review 48 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B

The Lowdown
While not a bad camera, this really wouldn’t be my first choice for going out and shooting. Easy to hold, mechanical, great optics, there’s just too many other factors that would make it more of a shelf queen to me. But if you’re looking for a solid German made camera, the Contaflex Super B is a great choice, just not my first one.

All Photos in The Junction, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B – Carl Zeiss Tessar 2,8/50 – ORWO UN54 @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 47 – Mamiya Universal

To say the Mamiya Universal is clunky and hard to use is an understatement. But it is not completely un-useable, you just need to find the flow of the camera. The Universal isn’t a bad camera, underrated, hard to use yes, but a good camera. The whole Mamiya Press/Universal/Polaroid 600SE had one thing in mind, replace the large format press cameras with roll film. The trouble with them is that they took too much out of the large format handbook than the roll film handbook. Special thanks to John Meadows for loaning out this camera for this review!

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal

The Dirt
Make: Mamiya
Model: Universal
Type: Rangefinder
Format: Multi-Format, back dependant
Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya Press Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1969

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal

The Good
The best part about the camera is that it is a true modular system, like the 35mm system SLRs, the Universal can be completely customized to suit whatever you need it to do. You have plenty of options for the film medium 120/220 (in the same back to boot) in all the major exposure sizes for medium format film (6×4.5, 6×6, 6×7, and 6×9). You can also mount a 2×3 sheet film back and a ground glass screen for focusing or a Type 100 Polaroid film back. For this test I shot with a 6×9 back, I feel that the camera would operate much better with a 6×7 back as it gave the photographer the same aspect ratio of 4×5 through a smaller negative size it brings the camera back to its roots of being a press camera. The Universal is also backed by a solid line of optics, after shooting with Mamiya-Sekor glass when I reviewed the RB67 I found the optics to be sharp and spot on. And the camera is a lot more portable than the average 4×5 press camera and the grip on the side helps with a trigger to fire off the shutter.

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal

The Bad
The one major issue that I alluded to in the introduction was the overall design of the camera. It’s as if Mamiya wanted to attract large format press camera users with a smaller form factor camera that offers all the steps of a 4×5 in a roll film camera. Personally, if I had the choice, I’d just throw a roll film back on my Crown Graphic and not look back. Let’s break it down; the Univeral is much more like a 4×5 camera than a roll film camera for the following reasons. There’s no dark slide interlock; you can shoot a whole roll of film and have nothing on your film because you can still trigger the shutter even with the dark slide in the film back. Advancing the film you have to disengage a safety catch, pull the film advance slightly release the catch and advance away (2-3 pulls), if you keep the catch disengaged, you will advance too far. Advancing the film also does not cock the shutter you have to do that in a separate step. Composing your images is difficult, now I’ve used plenty of rangefinders before but in this case, Mamiya could easily put the rangefinder/viewfinder closer along the sight line of the lens and run with it that way. And finally, you really need a steady hand with this camera, even shooting at 1/60″ I got noticeable camera shake even at 1/125″ you have to treat it like a sniper rifle, exhale and pull the release.

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal

The Lowdown
Mamiya had the chance to design a great camera, the Universal and Press models could have been a major player in the press camera market, but they got too much of the design wrong. Instead of making it easier to operate so that press photographers can pull off more images, they pandered to the large format market making the camera more familiar. If I want to shoot 4×5, I’ll grab my Crown Graphic and enjoy the long process of composing, exposing and setting up the shot. If I’m shooting roll film, I want a little more speed. I don’t know yet, but maybe the Koni-Omega will be a better camera (once I get mine fixed).

All Photos Taken at Black Creek Pioneer Village, Toronto, Ontario
Mamiya Universal – Mamiya-Sekor 1:4.5 f=127mm – Fuji Acros 100 @ ASA-100 – FA-1027 (1+14) 9:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 46 – Nikon Nikkormat FT3

To be perfectly honest, I’m a sucker for mechanical match needle SLRs. They’re simple, elegant and great to learn on and even now still a joy to shoot. The FT3 is just that, an easy to use, fun camera that can if needed double as a self-defense weapon. The sad part is that the FT3 only was made for a few months before being superseded by the Nikon FM. A unique creature among the more consumer oriented Nikkormat lines the FT3 can use AI and AI-S lenses even if they don’t have the coupling claw. Sadly you won’t be able to use the Non-AI glass that many Nikkormat shooters love.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Dirt
Make: Nikon
Model: Nikkormat FT3
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Nikon F Mount (AI)
Year of Manufacture: 1977-1979

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Good
The FT3 is a strong camera, hands down. The best part about it is that it can take AI/AI-S lenses, unlike previous Nikkormat models. Which means you have a solid lineup of glass available to you as well as inexpensive Nikon Series E which you shouldn’t dismiss out of hand. And while this is a slightly more modern camera it feels like one made in the 1950s or 1960s, but it still feels great in the hand. And as an added touch, I like the round film counter window adds a nice retro look to it. Combine the look, feel, and weight with a short throw on the film advance you have a comfortable camera to use. The FT3 is also built like a brick so you can easily take it into almost any situation and it will come out on top. And finally, there’s battery power, while not needed (thankfully) it takes a normal silver oxide cell, so you don’t have to worry about keeping the meter running.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Bad
Sadly the FT3 will not accept the Non-AI lenses; the coupling pin is missing from the camera body. While not a big issue for me as I have all AI/AI-S glass, it could be for someone who is using it to replace an older Nikkormat body. There are a few usability issues that I have with the camera that could be just because of age and my unfamiliarity with them. The first is the shutter speed control. The shutter speed dial is located on the lens mount, and while there is a nice handle, it is still not visible in the viewfinder which makes it a little difficult to operate the camera. Additionally, the slider for setting the film speed is a bit awkward to use as it is connected to a locking section of the shutter control handle. And last is a jumpy meter which could mean the camera just needs a good Clean, Lube, Adjust, but I have gotten good at catching a right meter reading before it jumps around. But since the FT3 is mechanical I can always fall back on Sunny-16.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Lowdown
The FT3 is the perfect camera if you want a solid mechanical camera that won’t break the bank, and already have a collection of AI/AI-S glass. And even though they don’t say ‘Nikon’ on the front doesn’t mean they don’t have the same quality. And if the older Nikkormats are just as good as the FT3 the whole series of cameras gets my blessing. Just watch out and get one that can use the lenses you have on the model as older Nikkormats require you to have the coupling claws present on the lens.

Photos taken in Toronto, Ontario
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

First Impressions – Japan Camera Hunter Streetpan 400

I’m not often one to give the first impression of a product, especially after only shooting it once. In fact, I think I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve been so impressed with a product I had to write a ‘first impression’ blog. The Nikon F2, Nikon F5, Sony a6000 are all cameras that I was so happy with I couldn’t wait to tell the world, now I add a fourth thing to the list, Japan Camera Hunter’s Streetpan 400. So when my order arrived the next photo walk, I went to I make sure my Nikon F5 was loaded with one film, Streetpan.

TFSM - Summer '16

TFSM - Summer '16

TFSM - Summer '16

I was pretty excited when Bellamy Hunt, the amazing photographer behind Japan Camera Hunter, announced that he was bringing back a dead film stock. That’s right, using money out of his own pocket, to bring back a film stock. Sadly the world of photography instead of being excited along with him, tore into him. It’s a sad state of affairs when that happens. But I stayed on the positive side of things, defending the film stock. Many claimed that it was dead-stock found in a dusty warehouse or just Retro 400s in a fancy new package. But I’ve shot Retro 400s, and this film stock, while similar in the sample images, certainly did not look like Retro 400s and the developing times were different. This was infact a rebirth of a film stock, something we in the film photography world don’t see often.

TFSM - Summer '16

TFSM - Summer '16

TFSM - Summer '16

What do I like about the film, well first off it’s a 400 speed film, as much as I like slower emulsions, when I’m out shooting in the streets or on vacation I want to be able to shoot quickly, see, think, shoot. So a fast film really is needed. It’s designed for scanning, the polyester base, while making it a little more of a pain to get onto the plastic developing spool, does dry and lay perfectly flat. And it’s really not as thin as other polyester base films I’ve shot like Retro 80s or the Svema line of films. And when it comes to scanning it is beautiful! I really didn’t have to make any real changes to the raw scans.

TFSM - Summer '16

TFSM - Summer '16

TFSM - Summer '16

So that’s about it, for now, once I start working with this film more and developing it in other developers like Rodinal and Xtol as well as more in HC-110. And see how it plays with other cameras in my collection I’ll do a more in-depth review, but for now, I’m leaving it at this. This film rocks, I’m looking forward to shooting it more, and if you like what you see head on over and give Bellamy some love and order yourself a brick. And just remember this is fresh stock, not dead, not rebranded. And today, a fresh film is always a good thing. Happy World Photography Day!

Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Japan Camera Hunter Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Bonus Episode – David Nardi, Part 2

ccr-logo-leaf

Part 2 of Special Guest Interview – David Nardi – David Nardi is the man behind the return of E-6 processing to the city of Toronto, John took some time (read several hours) to sit down and discuss processing and photography as a whole! If you want to learn more about his services and use them yourself you have head over to: www.e6it.ca Co-Host Mike has used E6it in the past, I highly recommend using David Nardi. His work is absolutely brilliant!  He treats every single roll of film as his own.  He uses fresh chemistry each time and loves film!

And don’t forget, our Classic Camera Revival GAS meet is only a week away! If you haven’t emailed us or RSVP’d on our Facebook event please do so. And we’re looking forward to seeing everyone who can make it there!

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario, if you’re on the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 33 – Lomography Horizon Kompakt

Probably one of my more interesting cameras in my tool kit, but one that I really like but don’t take out often enough. I guess that’s the biggest problem with having a lot of working cameras. This Lomography camera is a copy of the Zenit Horzion 202, a panoramic camera designed for use in the Soviet Space program during the height of the cold war. This odd camera certainly caught my eye so when I netted a good discount with Lomography I went and picked it up. While not one work with every day, it’s still a really fun camera for a different look.

CCR - Review 33 - Lomography Horizon Kompakt

The Dirt
Make: Lomography
Model: Horizon Kompakt
Type: Panoramic, Swing Lens
Format: 35mm, 24×70
Lens: Fixed, Обьектив ИНДУСТАР MC 8/28 (Objective INDUSTAR, 28mm 1:8)
Year of Manufacture: 2010

CCR - Review 33 - Lomography Horizon Kompakt

CCR - Review 33 - Lomography Horizon Kompakt

The Good
This is a fun camera, hands down. It gives you a very unique image as it’s panoramic, true panoramic not just cropped down like some point-and-shoot cameras. And even though loading the film is troublesome, it’s really easy to use, just point and shoot, from the hip even! And since it’s a swing-lens camera it produces some funky effects when you have objects in motion, it’s almost cartoon like.

CCR - Review 33 - Lomography Horizon Kompakt

CCR - Review 33 - Lomography Horizon Kompakt

The Bad
Probably the one thing I have a problem with in the camera is that it’s a bear to load. Seriously, you need to do it very carefully and properly for the camera to work its magic. If you do get one I highly recommend visiting a Lomography store and letting one of the staff members to show you how. Or visit YouTube to see if there’s a video explaining it. You will want to see it visually because it is hard to describe in text only. And while I don’t find it an issue personally another draw back is that this camera is simple, you have two “shutter speeds” so you really have to tailor the film you load into the camera for what and where you’re shooting. And finally there is the price tag, ringing in at 250$ in change which can be a bit steep for people.

CCR - Review 33 - Lomography Horizon Kompakt

CCR - Review 33 - Lomography Horizon Kompakt

The Lowdown
While many out there are detractors of the Lomography brand I actually really like this camera, it’s well made, just don’t be too rough on it, and produces a fantasic image. And most importantly it is fun. But again it’s not really for everyone, if you want a little more control check out it’s bigger brother the Horizon Perfekt for a lot more control over your camera settings.

All photos taken in High Park, Toronto, Ontario
Lomography Horizon Kompakt – Обьектив ИНДУСТАР MC 8/28 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-200 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Real People are More Interesting

Paparazzi, Paparazzi…the taunts seemed almost to be sung as I grabbed a shot of two women walking across the street. They don’t bother me, besides I’m far from a paparazzi photographer, these two women are not famous nor am I going to be selling these photos. Besides I can barely hear the voices over the History Extra Podcast about Richard I and the Third Crusade.

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

Having just come from a beautiful photowalk in the High Park Area I had some time to kill before meeting up with my buddy James at Trinity-Bellwood Park to head up to the Dakota Tavern to catch the Silver Hearts playing live so I popped down to Downtown Camera and picked up another roll of film to load up and do some street photography as I walked along Queen Street.

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

I don’t practice Street Photography that often, I have to feel in the right mood, the camera I have has to sit right and the film has to suit the light. The film I ended up grabbing was Rollei Retro 400s a film I hadn’t ever used but my gut was telling me this would be a good film to use in the slowly dying light of downtown Toronto.

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

Some of the people whom I caught on film noticed me, well with the gear I was using there really wasn’t any surprise, there’s a reason many street photographers prefer the smaller silent cameras to the bulk of a professional SLR. I flashed a quick smile which was returned and then I was gone, carried on west by my quick pace the camera settled back into my arm waiting to be used again.

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

And it just goes to show…that in the long run, I’ll leave the stars to the paparazzi, for me, real people are more interesting.

Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Rollei Retro 400s
Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 9:30 @ 20C
Epson V700
Adobe Photoshop CC (2015)