While Milton itself doesn’t have any real involvement in the significant events in Canadian history, our existence is thanks to the War of 1812. Following the war’s conclusion in 1815, the Colonial Office in England began to encourage increased colonial expansion into Upper Canada. After the widespread purchase of large tracts of land from the Mississauga’s of the Credit, a section designated at Lot 14, Concession 2 of the Trafalgar Township went to Jasper Martin. After emigrating to Upper Canada along with his wife Sarah and two sons, Joseph and Edward, Jasper would settle on his plot in 1821. Within a year Jasper had aRead More →

Long before Europeans arrived in what would become Canada, the land was far from empty. Thankfully these days we do have a record of the history of our region, passed down now only through the oral history of those peoples and archaeological evidence. Here in Milton we still maintain that link to the pre-contact past in the form of a 15th-century village built by the Haudenosaunee or People of the Long House. If that name seems strange to you, that’s okay, you better know them as the Iroquois. Archaeological digs discovered in 1971 the remains of this village after the area once home to theRead More →

While today it’s been several years since its introduction, Xtol marks the last developer to come out of Kodak. And as developers go, it is the least toxic of all the ones available on the general market. The reason is that it uses Ascorbic Acid as one of the active ingredients. It not only allows for sharpness but also reducing visible grain in the process. But Xtol is also a developer with a flawed history; you need to mix up a lot to maintain its stability. And while I no longer keep Xtol in my toolkit, it remains a beautiful developer that is perfect ifRead More →

If you are a follower of my work and this blog, you’ll know that I tend to combine my love of history with my love of photography. And when I learned that the FP4Party was coming back in 2020, I made a plan to shoot four rolls over four days and just keep it random such as what I had always done in the past. But sometimes things and situations change and suddenly the weekend of the FP4Party shoot week became busy with some family matters calling my attention. I had to sit back down at the drawing board and figure out a new plan,Read More →

What is home? It’s a question that many people have asked and those well versed in philosophy and have come up with many answers. Is home where you live, or where you were born? Or maybe it’s where your parents live? If you’re looking for that answer here, you’re in the wrong place. This is a project about my home, a town called Milton. The sign that welcomed people to Milton has changed a lot since I first arrived here with my parents; my dad wanted to deface the sign by painting a giant one making the population 30,001. He didn’t, and that sign isRead More →

One of the first History courses I took in High School was Canada in the 20th Century. Most Canadian history texts that are used in schools start at this point. And there’s no surprise. As a nation, Canada came into its own in the 20th Century. Many point the crucible of World War One as the focal point. Others state the post World War Two era leading up to the 100th Anniversary of Confederation. But everything that happened in the 20th Century built on what happened before and the sins of the past were going to come back to haunt. As Canada emerged from theRead More →

The term Dominion within the British Empire was not new. England first used the term to describe its relationship with Wales, much to the chagrin of the Welsh. But in the new Canadian context, Dominion would be a new concept. Canada was not a Province of the greater Empire, nor was she fully independent. A Dominion was a grey area, autonomous in all domestic concerns, but in the greater world, she remained sub-servant to England. In a nutshell, this meant that the Governor-General represented not only the interests of the Crown and the British Parliament, and Canada could neither send or receive ambassadors from foreignRead More →

If you’re wondering what everything has been leading up to this is it, we’re in the end game now. The road to Canadian Confederation is a long and rough one, with many false starts, failures to push through and roadblocks along the way. From the cause for political reform in the 1820s the rebellions of the 1830s. In through the victory of reform in the 1840s and the rocky roads in the 1850s. The threats to Canadian territory through invasion or annexation, it all leads to this, confederation. Despite the momentum in the aftermath of the Charlottetown and Quebec Conferences in 1864, the passage ofRead More →

When you’re in a situation and your reputation is on the line you need something that works. But if the customer, client, or even your own personal project is on the line and you have to use film, then you want something that will work. Like work always, in any situation! Ilford FP4+ If you miss the ASA-125 rating of Kodak Plus-X, then look no further than Ilford FP4+. A film that dates back to the 1930s and has changed and grown as technology improved. FP4+ is Alex’s choice for outdoor shooting when the light is nice, even if cloudly. It responds well to beingRead More →

In the grander scheme, the Battle of Ridgeway gets all the glory when it comes to the limited history of the Fenian Raids of 1866. And yet a second skirmish took place almost instantly after the one at Ridgeway. The sad fact is that both battles could have been avoided and maybe the whole matter could have been better remembered. But to understand where the Battle of Fort Erie came from, we must first go back to Port Colborne, where we split off last week on the 1st of June 1866. Lieutenant-Colonel John Stoughton Dennis felt left out, a blow to his fragile ego. DespiteRead More →