Over the previous year, I worked hard to expand my knowledge of black & white film developers and find myself down a deep rabbit hole. Some good, some meh. Some I didn’t care for or I found them to be too specialised for average use. And while I have several up for review later this year and you can check those out later, here are seven that have stood out in my head as worthy of using again and of getting you out of the rut of using the more vanilla developers like D-76/ID-11, HC-110/Ilfotec HC, and Rodinal. 1 – Adox FX-39 II Based onRead More →

When it comes past projects related to history which I have written, the foundations of the events which I planned to explore are relatively modern happening some three to two hundred years in the past. A small drop in the bucket of the history of our planet. But when it comes to the Welland Canal, the foundations of that canal take place in the dark distances of prehistory. The need for a canal across the Niagara Peninsula is related to a massive limestone cliff that cuts across the modern province of Ontario known today as the Niagara Escarpment. Today the cliff runs from the NiagaraRead More →

Earlier this year I completed the second major historical photographic project on the Confederation of Canada and the events and places that lead up to the joining of four British Provinces in British North America into the Dominion of Canada in 1867. Over the course of that project, I came across many events and locations that inspired me to try and tell the deeper story. Of course, I couldn’t tell every story so instead, I selected two that I felt I couldn’t tell the whole story due to the timeline for the project ending in 1867. One of these is the railroad through Ontario theRead More →

At the beginning of this project, I asked the question where is home? And through these weeks I have shared with you the places and stories in Milton, but I have left this building until last. And with good reason, this is my home today. It might not look like much, but home is so much more than a big fancy building or lots of space. Home is where you choose to make it and who you choose to make it with. And while some days I feel like the walls of the condo are closing it, there is no place I’d rather be rightRead More →

When it comes to the buildings in downtown Milton there has been on that is somewhat of a nemesis for me and getting a decent photo of the rather rundown stone structure. The Thompson House, once one on many hotels that populated the Milton. Constructed by Charles H. Thompson in 1847 as the second hotel in the small town of Milton, the original building would be replaced in 1864 and the same crew went onto to build the first town hall in 1865. The three-story stone structure boasted fourteen rooms, four parlours, a dining room and a wine cellar. It quickly became a popular jointRead More →

Yes, church buildings have featured prominently in this project, and that should come as no surprise as many of the oldest buildings in town are churches. But also they are some of the more interesting buildings in town to photograph. One of my first photo projects was related to Milton’s churches. Despite the look of the grey fieldstone Grace Anglican Church the current building standing on the hill looking down on the main street is not the oldest church in town nor is this building the original building for the Anglicans in Milton. While the congregation dates to the 1850s and if you will noticeRead More →

Unless you live in Milton, you may not realise the rich architectural heritage that my hometown has to offer. Sadly many of our oldest buildings no longer stand and most that do stand date only to the mid-century, that century is the 19th. And I would have many different homes to choose from, but I wanted something new different and never have been in my camera’s viewfinder before. The Lawson House dates to 1893 built by a local merchant. Sadly I cannot find anything about John Lawson or what role he played in the town. But I do like the house, the creeping vines alongRead More →

There are several iconic buildings that sit along Milton’s main street. There’s the old City Hall, the Quality Green sign, the various churches, the Ivy Arms pub. But besides the churches, there has always been one building that drew my eye, the brick post office. While not the original Milton post office, that post office from 1836 is what earned Milton its name as decided by George Brown (who would become the town’s first Mayor). To the best of my knowledge that post office served until the brick one opened, its cornerstone laid in a grand ceremony in the summer of 1914. Located at theRead More →

In the archives of the Milton Champion newspaper, there is a file photo of two little boys looking with smiles on a ball and chain. The two boys are myself and my brother who took a tour of the Town Hall during a New Year’s Day event hosted by the town mayor Gord Krantz. And it shows the dark history of the town hall. When Halton County became independent, the Foster family wanted to ensure Milton’s status as the county seat, and in 1855 a county court, jail, and land registry office were completed. The building saw expansion in 1877 adding on the jail anRead More →

These days you probably would walk past this building without a second glance, a little bit out of the way of the downtown and overlooked by many but this building once was the centre of the town of Milton. When Milton saw incorporation as a town in 1858, the need to construct a town hall began. As a building, it served many purposes once it saw completion in 1865 as a market hall and local police station. The land it sits on was donated by Joseph Martin (one of Jasper’s sons) and once had a beautiful bell and cupola, both of which have been removed.Read More →