Tag Archives: Ancaster

An Extra Special Gift

This was certainly a first for me. I’ve been doing the photography thing for many years, and while my favourite subjects are things that really can’t move around, I do find myself enjoying the few portrait and wedding gigs that I come across. But when it came to shooting maternity it was all new territory. And it can be a pretty creepy one also. You look at places like Pinterest, and you can get carried away by semi-nude women showing off their pregnant bodies. Now before you lay on the hate, I’m not saying that’s a bad thing or wrong. I just don’t like that style of shooting, and when my subjects are my soon-to-be brother & sister-in-law. That’s just not the direction I want to take.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + Konica Hexanon 1:2.8 f=35mm

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + Konica Hexanon 1:2.8 f=35mm

The idea is Heather’s who came up with the idea to do a shoot with them once we found out they were expecting, and it became all the more special when the one baby was two. Yep, instant niece and nephew added in, and just before my wedding. It did take Holly a bit of time to warm up to the idea of having maternity photos done. And I can understand that she also does photography, and it’s difficult for a photographer to stand in front of the camera rather than behind.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + KMZ Helios 44-2 2/58

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

Thankfully we had just the right weather to be outside, well it was a little cold for Evan and Holly, I at least could keep my coat on. And for the backdrop, we took advantage of being in Hamilton the city of waterfalls and worked at Tiffany and Sherman Falls. What makes this whole thing extra special is that Evan and Holly had been waiting a long time to start a family, so it was an amazing idea from Heather to document it right from the beginning.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

The great part was that once I got rolling with the photos it went really well, both Evan and Holly were great subjects, and the process moved along well. I found myself looking only once at a few saved images on Pinterest and then settled into my usual groove when shooting portraits. The only thing different was making sure to show off the baby bump! And no, I’m not getting into newborn photography, but I think I’d be okay doing another maternity shoot of the same style.

400TX:365 – Week 14 – Ancaster

Note to Self: When wanting to reuse fixer, mix a stronger dilution.

Oops. Yeah, I fixed this roll of film in exhausted fixer so lets say that the results were well interesting, but with a bit of work in Photoshop I was able to recover some images, but the contrast just wasn’t there that I’m used to in Tri-X. But I had to post them anyways. Today we visit the small village of Ancaster located in the shadow of the Niagara Escarpment. I took a break from the family Easter dinner to wander the historic downtown. The main draw for me was the historic mill, now an upscale restaurant, was used to house prisoners during the Bloody Assizes of 1814 during the later end of the War of 1812, also two fantastic waterfalls.

400TX:365 - Week 14 - Ancaster Village

400TX:365 - Week 14 - Ancaster Village

400TX:365 - Week 14 - Ancaster Village

400TX:365 - Week 14 - Ancaster Village

400TX:365 - Week 14 - Ancaster Village

400TX:365 - Week 14 - Ancaster Village

400TX:365 - Week 14 - Ancaster Village

Project:1812 – The Ancaster Assizes of 1814

When the United States of America declared war on the British Empire, they knew they could not go toe to toe with the might of the British Navy. Instead, they invaded the closest British held territory, Upper, and Lower Canada. Not all the citizens in the British-controlled colony were on the side of the Empire, many in fact supported the American invasion and wanted to see the British influences in North America removed. Some left Upper Canada for the USA, and some others chose to help the Americans on the Canadian side of the border. Most citizens of Upper Canada supported the British Forces, many fought to defend Upper Canada, joining the Incorporated Canadian Militia, but in November and December of 1813, a few raids by British Regulars and Militia discovered a group of raiders that had been preying on Upper Canada in Chatham, Ontario. Many were American citizens sent to cause havoc in the British-held territory, but there were several British Citizens among those captured.

Project:1812 - Battle of the Thames
Raids against suspected traitors were conducted out in the western areas of Upper Canada. Such as here along the Tecumseh Memorial Route.
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-200 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. E 6:30 @ 20C

These men were arrested and charged with treason, fifteen in all; they joined four more men in York (Modern Day Toronto), then the capital of Upper Canada to await trial. Chief Justice William Scott presided over the trails supported by two other judges, William Dummer Powell and William Campbell. The court opened on May 23rd, 1814, with charges read against the nineteen captured men and fifty more still at large. The colonial government realized that the only place in Upper Canada capable of holding these trials was Ancaster, Ontario. The small town was the only one with building large enough to hold the crowds that the trials would ultimately attract. The building chosen was the Old Stone Hotel, during the trials it was known as the Rousseau Hotel. The trials lasted from June 7th to the 21st, 1814, and saw fourteen of the nineteen captured found guilty either through their admittance or evidence presented to the court. The sentencing of the men found guilty was delayed until July 20th to allow them, if they wished to seek Royal Mercy.

Project:1812 - Acaster and the Bloody Assizes
The Old Stone Hotel, built in 1878 used some of the original Rousseau Hotel that housed the 1814 Assizes.
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Old School Photolab

For the fourteen convicted seven were sentenced to death and were sent to The Heights and hanged. The remaining seven were sent to prison and began the long journey to Kingston. They attempted to escape the night of July 31st, 1814 and never made it too far. Three died of typhoid in 1815 the remaining four were given pardons on the condition of exile.

Project:1812 - Acaster and the Bloody Assizes
A plaque dedicated to the Ancaster Assizes of 1814 stands in front of Lincon Memorial School in Ancaster, ON
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Old School Photolab

Written with files from:
Guidebook to the Historic Sites of the War of 1812 Second Edition by Gilbert Collins – 2006 The Dundurn Group Publishers
Web: http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/articles/ancaster
Web: http://www.corvalliscommunitypages.com/Americas/hudsonbay_canada/ancaster_bloody_assize_of_1815.htm

Taken on
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 – Kodak Tri-X 400 (400TX)