Tag Archives: Olympus

CCR Review 50 – Olympus OM-1

When it comes to the 1970s, the market was flooded with some very similar, yet different 35mm SLRs. The decade saw the rise of names like Minolta, Olympus, and Pentax to counter the big two of Canon and Nikon. The second review I wrote for this series was on the Pentax K1000, a fantastic camera, but now let me introduce to you to the OM-1. The camera that the K1000 should have been (sort of).

CCR Review 50 - Olympus OM-1

The Dirt
Make: Olympus
Model: OM-1
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 135, 35×24
Lens: Interchangeable, OM Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1972

CCR Review 50 - Olympus OM-1

CCR Review 50 - Olympus OM-1

The Good
I like the OM-1, I do. It’s a solid camera that’s great in the hands; lightweight yet has heft. Easy to carry, and even easier to use. I keep on saying you can’t beat a match-needle camera for learning photography on, and the OM-1 certainly doesn’t get the same level of praise as the school favourite K1000. And in many ways, the OM-1 is a slightly better camera for the student. The number one reason is that they are pretty cheap, you can pick up an OM-1 with a 50mm lens for under 100$. The camera is entirely mechanical, the battery only operates the meter, and the camera has a dedicated on/off switch, so you don’t need to fumble around for a lens cap like you do with the K1000. In general, the camera is well laid out with all the controls right there on the lens. Now if you’re unfamiliar with lens mounted controls, this might take a bit to get used to, I know I struggled with it on the Nikkormat FT3, but having experienced it there made going to the OM-1 easier.

CCR Review 50 - Olympus OM-1

CCR Review 50 - Olympus OM-1

The Bad
I feel I’m a broken record on this subject but the issue first and foremost is that the camera needs a mercury cell to operate. These can be hard to acquire, but they do last. Now you can use a 1.5v alkaline battery and in some cases it may work but in the case of the OM-1 I would not recommend it, the first roll I shot the metering was way off! The next trouble I have with the camera is the lack of an integral hot shoe. That’s right; there’s no built-in hot shoe but a separate accessory that you attach to the top of the prism to include that. Now the camera does have a PC socket so you can use a bracket to mount your flash. It’s almost as if Olympus had taken their idea right from Nikon. At least with Olympus, the hot shoe was a standard one, unlike Nikon where you had the weird over the film rewind mount.

CCR Review 50 - Olympus OM-1

CCR Review 50 - Olympus OM-1

The Lowdown
As I said in my introduction, the OM-1 is the camera the K1000 could have been. And sadly it’s lived in the shadow of that iconic student camera. The ultimate student camera would take the general size of the K1000, include lens mounted controls, an on/off switch, a hot shoe, and match needle metering. In all seriousness, the OM-1 is a fantastic camera with which you can easily learn photography that won’t break the bank or your back.

All Photos Taken in Hamilton, Ontario
Olympus OM-1 – Olympus F.Zuiko 1:1.8 f=50mm – ORWO UN54+ @ ASA-100 – HC-110 Dil. A 7:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 30 – Olympus Stylus Epic DLX

It’s yet another winner from the wonderful folks at Olympus! This is probably my favourite modern point & shoot camera, no fuss, no muss. If I want to just go out and shoot and not have to worry about carrying bags of additional gear, or at a wedding when you don’t want to pull out the SLR and don’t want to fiddle with an XA. Small, compact, with amazing results.

CCR - Review 30 - Olympus Stylus Epic DLX

The Dirt
Make: Olympus
Model: Stylus Epic DLX (µ[mju:]-II)
Type: Point and Shoot
Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
Lens: Fixed, Olympus Lens 35mm 1:2.8
Year of Manufacture: 1997

CCR - Review 30 - Olympus Stylus Epic DLX

CCR - Review 30 - Olympus Stylus Epic DLX

The Good
Probably the best part about this camera is the size, it’s small, sleek and fits in almost every pocket, simple to operate, just slide the plate open and you’re ready to shoot! And shoot you can, this has a fixed 35mm lens and at f/2.8 wide open it works great even without flash in low light. And the lens is sharp, while not branded with the traditional Zuiko that many Olympus cameras have it certainly stands up to the Olympus tradition of great optics. And these cameras are cheap and plentiful! And you don’t need to go with the Stylus Epic (DLX) to get great results even an original Stylus stands out as a fantastic camera that is basically the same camera. Also of note the camera is known as the mju-II which was sold in the Japanese market.

CCR - Review 30 - Olympus Stylus Epic DLX

CCR - Review 30 - Olympus Stylus Epic DLX

The Bad
So there are a couple of bad points on the camera, the first is the flash, it’s always on, you can turn it off. But as soon as you turn off the camera and turn it back on you have to again turn off the flash. Which isn’t a bad thing but it is a minor annoyance. The second point is the battery, the CR123 isn’t exactly the cheapest battery out there, but it can be a bit hard to find outside of a camera store or a dedicated electronics/battery shop, and certainly not in the middle of nowhere. That said the camera is pretty good on batteries and you can’t accidentally turn it on in your pocket or bag.

CCR - Review 30 - Olympus Stylus Epic DLX

CCR - Review 30 - Olympus Stylus Epic DLX

The Lowdown
This camera really isn’t for everyone, but for those who love to shoot Olympus and want a camera that will give good results with minimal involvement from you, then this would be a solid choice. Or for a film photographer who wants to keep a low profile at a party or wedding and still shoot with film. They’re cheap, they’re plentiful and there’s a good chance you can even find one in your local thrift store!

All photos taken through Central Ontario including Balaclava, Bancroft, and Burleigh Falls
Olympus Stylus Epic DLX – Olympus Lens 35mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Blazinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 13 – Marry your Lenses, Date you Cameras

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Probably one of the best things to actually invest in with your camera kit is lenses, as the title says, marry your lenses, date your cameras. Once you’ve figured out what system you want to shoot with, invest in glass, so on this the first episode of our second season the gang talks about their favourite lenses!

Glass Featured on Today’s Show…

In 35mm…
Canon FD Lens S.S.C. 50mm 1:1.4 – While on the surface this is just another 50mm FD Canon lens which are already a fantastic lens to shoot on all your FD mount cameras what sets this camera about is the SSC or coating which makes it stand out from the rest!

  • Manufacturer: Canon
  • Mount: Canon FD Mount
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Aperture Range: f/1.4 – f/16, 8 blades
  • Elements: 7 Elements in 6 Groups

Bike Lock
Canon T90 – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 S. S. C. – Rollei Retro 80s @ EI400 – HC-110 Dil. B

Careful Footing
Canon AE-1 – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 S. S. C. – Kodak Elitechrome 100

Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – This won’t be the first planar lens on today’s episode, mostly because this is a super sharp lens, and even through it is made in Japan not German, they certainly didn’t do anything to mess it up! Other than being a general everyday carry lens, Alex loves it for street photography because you can get both wide and close shots without standing out too much.

  • Manufacturer: Kyoceria under License from Carl Zeiss
  • Mount: Contax G-Mount
  • Focal Length: 45mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2 – f/16, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

Toronto - Dec 30th, 2015
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Eastman Double-X 5222 @ ASA-200 – Kodak DK-50 (1+1) 6:00 @ 20C

Toronto - December 30th, 2015
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Svema Foto 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford Microphen (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

Helios-44/2 – This odd-ball Soviet lens is one of John’s favourite for portrait work. And has gained a bit of a cult following!

  • Manufacturer: KMZ, MMZ, Jupiter
  • Mount: Multiple, Commonly M39, M42, K-Mount
  • Focal Length: 58mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2 – f/16 or f/22, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

Shooting film
Zenit 3M – Helios 44/2 58mm/f2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Pyrocat HD (1+1+100) 16:00

Adriana film 2
Spotmatic SP – Helios 44/2 58mm f/2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-100 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 8:30

Voigtlander Super Wide-Heliar Aspherical II 15mm f/4.5

  • Manufacturer: Voigtlander
  • Mount: Leica Thread Mount (LTM, M39) or Leica M-Mount
  • Focal Length: 15mm
  • Aperture Range: f/4.5 – f/22, 10 blades
  • Elements: 8 Elements in 6 Groups

Old Cold Car
Voigtlander Bessa R – Voigtlander Super Wide-Heliar Aspherical 15mm f/4.5 – Rollei RPX 25 film

College Library in Ann Arbour
Voigtlander Bessa R – Voigtlander Super Wide-Heliar Aspherical 15mm f/4.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Xtol (1+1) 9:00

Olympus F.Zuiko Auto-S 50mm 1:1.8 – This lens is the key lens to anyone starting their own OM kit, lightweight and legendary optics and looks great at any aperture.

  • Manufacturer: Olympus
  • Mount: OM
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Aperture Range: f/1.8 – f/16
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 5 Groups

2 great people

OlySup200Scan-141026-0005

In Medium…
Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – This super sharp and legendary medium format lens is one that Alex has used several times, first on his Rolleiflex and now on the Hasselblad 500c.

  • Manufacturer: Carl Zeiss
  • Mount: Multiple
  • Focal Length: 80mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2.8 – f/22, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

TFSM Fall '15  - The Distillery District
Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Rollei RPX 400 @ ASA-320 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 18:00 @ 20C

Off the Deep End
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-200 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Bronica Zenzanon 150mm 1:4 – This incredible sharp at any aperture portrait lens for the SQ line of cameras plus it makes for a great longer lens for more detailed landscape work as well!

  • Manufacturer: Bronica
  • Mount: SQ Bayonet
  • Focal Length: 150mm
  • Aperture Range: f/4 – f/22, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 5 Groups

Into The Depths of Dementia
Zenza Bronica SQ-Ai – Zenzanon-PS 150mm 1:4 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 10:30 @ 20C

Portrait of an Urban Photographer
Zenza Bronica SQ-Ai – Zenzanon-PS 150mm 1:4 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 10:30 @ 20C

Schneider-Kreuznach Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5

  • Manufacturer: Schneider-Kreuznach
  • Mount: Multiple
  • Focal Length: 75mm
  • Aperture Range: f/3.5 – f/16, x blades
  • Elements: 5 Elements in 4 Groups

Banff
Rolleiflex 3.5E3 – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5 – Ilford Pan F+

Outside of Edinburgh Castle
Rolleiflex 3.5E3 – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 6:00

Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=50mm – This is the wide angle lens you want if you’re running a Bronica-EC, great for groups or landscape shots with little distortion and super easy to focus!

  • Manufacturer: Nikon
  • Mount: Bronica Bayonet
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Aperture Range: f/3.5 – f/22
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 3 Groups

BronicaECVerichrome2015-10-14-0001scan
Bronica EC – Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=50mm – Kodak Verichrome Pan

BronicaECVerichrome2015-10-14-0010scan
Bronica EC – Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=50mm – Kodak Verichrome Pan

In Large…
Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar f:4.5 105mm – It’s amazing that this lens is actually off a medium format 6×9 camera but it has just enough coverage for 4×5 but only if you leave any sort of movements alone.

  • Manufacturer: Carl Zeiss
  • Mount: No. 1
  • Focal Length: 105mm
  • Aperture Range: f/4.5 – f/32
  • Elements: 4 Elements in 3 Groups

Ghostly Sitting
Calumet CC400 – Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 105mm ƒ/4.5 – Shanghai GP3 @ ASA-100 – Rodinal 1+100 (Stand Developed)

My Son in The Sun
Calumet CC400 – Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 105mm ƒ/4.5 – Shanghai GP3 @ ASA-100 – Rodinal 1+100 & HC-110 1+200 combo (Semi-Stand)

Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Alex’s go-to lens for shooting 4×5 this wonderful short telephoto is great for portraits and even some landscape work when you don’t need ‘the big picture’

  • Manufacturer: Schneider-Kreuznach
  • Mount: No. 1
  • Focal Length: 210mm
  • Aperture Range: f/5.6 – f/64, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

A MiG
Intrepid – Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Adox CHS 100 II – Blazinal (1+25) 5:00 @ 20C

The Stone Bridge (From Below)
Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-200 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 9:00 @ 20C

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario, if you’re on the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 29 – Olympus 35SP

Playing along the same lines of the fixed lens camera rangefinders of the 1960s and 70s the Olympus 35 SP is one of the top models that you can get from that era, I’d actually rank it equal with the Minolta Hi-Matic 7s. And the best part as many people go for the Cannonet line of cameras, the 35 SP again like the 7s is more of an underdog camera and like many Olympus cameras has gained somewhat of a cult following. But what made the camera stand out among it’s peers that a dual metering system that had both a center weighted and an on-demand spot meter as well that were both available even when the camera was in manual mode.

CCR - Review 29 - Olympus 35 SP

The Dirt
Make: Olympus
Model: 35 SP
Type: Rangefinder
Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
Lens: Fixed, Olympus G.Zuiko 1:1,7 f=42mm
Year of Manufacture: 1969-1976

CCR - Review 29 - Olympus 35 SP

CCR - Review 29 - Olympus 35 SP

The Good
This is a fantastic camera, light weight, easy to handle, the focus ring has a wonderful lever that makes it super smooth to focus without moving your hand from the bottom of the camera. And pairing that with the sharp just a little wider than normal 42mm Zuiko lens makes the images even better. But the thing that makes the camera really shine is the meter. This was one of the few fixed lens rangefinders that has a dual meter, both center weighted normally and a button you press that gives you a spot meter reading. And to make it even better the camera meter does this in both fully automatic mode and manual mode. And as for manual mode the camera meter display in the finder uses the EV scale, but on the lens barrel you can easy adjust the aperture and shutter speed and a display window will give you your EV number. Or just run full manually with Sunny-16 or an external meter as the mechanical body will run even without a battery.

CCR - Review 29 - Olympus 35 SP

CCR - Review 29 - Olympus 35 SP

The Bad
Like many of these cameras of the era the camera does take a mercury battery so finding one with a functioning battery is possible but rare and the replacements are out there but again cost a bit of money and don’t last as long. But on the other side of the coin being a mechanical camera means it will function even without a battery. The second beef I have with the camera isn’t the meter itself but the placement of the meter. The window is off to the side so if you want to use filters on the camera you do have to take the filter factor into account and even with my head it’s difficult to figure that out on the fly. So generally I don’t.

CCR - Review 29 - Olympus 35 SP

CCR - Review 29 - Olympus 35 SP

The Lowdown
These are certainly beautiful cameras to both shoot with and use, and being a bit on the side of the underdog you can get these for fairly cheap and they really won’t let you down. With a solid meter and great optics, as well as fantastic handling. If you’re looking for a good camera for street work or just a general travel camera that you can throw in your bag, the 35 SP or any camera from the Olympus 35 series will suit you just fine!

All photos taken in Oakville, Ontario
Olympus Stylus Epic DLX – Olympus G.Zuiko 1:1,7 f=42mm – Svema Foto 400 – Xtol (1+1) 14:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 26 – Olympus XA

Probably the most powerful pocket camera I’ve ever used, the Olympus XA brings the power of the rangefinder, aperture priority and stunning optics into something that can fit in almost every pocket. I’ve used a couple cameras from the XA line in the past, the terribly restrictive XA1 (don’t let the 1 fool you, the 1 came later than the XA and was pretty darn limited), along with the wide angle XA4, but the XA is truly where Olympus made something that was nothing short of magic.

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA

The Dirt
Make: Olympus
Model: XA
Type: Rangefinder
Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
Lens: Fixed, Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm
Year of Manufacture: 1979

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA

The Good
There are several excellent points on the XA. First and foremost is the optical quality, it seems that Olympus managed to nail down optics for these tiny cameras such as the Trip 35 and even the later Stylus line of cameras. You wouldn’t think, because of the size of the XA that the F.Zuiko lens would be as sharp as it is, but I wasn’t disappointed when I pulled the film out of the tank. Size wise you can’t beat the power that this little rangefinder has in the tiny form factor and simplicity in design with the clamshell on/off switch and weight, you’d forget it was even in your pocket. And finally the camera is pretty darn easy to use, everything is neatly laid out, and even though it’s aperture priority you can still see the shutter speeds displayed in the view finder so you can adjust the aperture accordingly.

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA

The Bad
Everything they say about the shutter release being super sensitive is true, in fact there’s a good chance that by reading this article that you’ve set off several of the XAs around the world, that is providing they’re turned on. When it comes to handling the camera itself feels pretty good, however I do have issue with the focusing leaver, often I wouldn’t be able to pull the focus without having to look to make sure that I was using the leaver at the correct angle and pressure, since if you don’t it does tend to stick. And finally the flash unit, the camera itself is a nice compact package at least until you throw on the side-car flash then it adds a bit of extra length which for me throws off the whole feel of the camera as being a nice compact powerhouse. But I don’t use flash that often on these tiny cameras so I just leave it off.

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA

The Lowdown
If you want to go ultra-light to a photowalk and not loose out on quality, power, and the ablity to manually focus then this is your camera. Also if you’re a street photographer who just wants something that is probably the ultimate stealth camera the XA won’t let you down either. Just keep that trigger finger away from the shutter release until you have your shot ready. Sadly these cameras being a bit of a cult classic do carry a bit more a price tag than say the XA2 or XA3 but those cameras will do you just fine also you just lose the rangefinder focus.

All photos taken in Erie, PA, USA
Olympus XA – Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm – Ultrafine Xtreme 400
Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:30 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 8 – Welcome to Mount Olympus

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It’s the home of the Greek gods and producer of several ‘cult classic’ cameras, today join Mike, Donna, and John (Alex has been captured by the French but should be back next month) as they dive into the wonderful world of Olympus cameras.

Cameras featured on Today’s Show…

John and The Olympus Pen F

The Olympus Pen F is a classic, and unique as the only dedicated 35mm half-frame ever made. Beautiful to hold and handle, it is a joy to use!

Here is a great information page on this little jewel.

Here’s my Pen F, on a recent “photo outing”

penF

And here are a couple of images taken with my Pen F.

penfKen

My friend Ken, taken with Eastman Double-X film

RolleiRetro1

An example of Rollei Retro 80s shot on the Half Frame

Here’s Mike talking about the “Olympus Trip 35”

Olympus Trip 35..Ahhh… the cult camera without holding the status of CULT. The Olympus Trip 35. Being that it is a 35mm zone/scale focus camera, you have to guess the distance from the front element of the camera to the subject. This is easily done through the viewfinder where you will see the “Head and Shoulders” “Two Half Torsos” “Multiple Bodies” “Mountains” symbols for making guesstimate shooting easy. I can easily attest to that. This camera really does make focusing super simple! With shots of landscapes, people, moving objects and even that snap candid, this camera does not disappoint! It has a fantastic leaf shutter along with an ‘auto’ aperture that gives you all the shooting power you need. Although it only has 2 shutter speeds (1/40s and 1/200s) it seems to hold up just fine and dandy compared to many other more modern cameras. In my hands it is lightweight and easily held for long periods of time without fatigue. The viewfinder is big and bright, only second to the Voigtlander Vito for brightness and size. However, it is the optics that stand out! The 40mm ƒ/2.8 Zuiko wide-angle lens is just stunningly sharp! Yes, I know. 2.8? Not the ‘fastest’ of lenses but far from slow in the realm of even modern optics. But enough of the GAS fest for this camera, what can it do? Oh simple.. It can do a whole lot! Definitely a Recommended Camera from the CCR! Decaying Picnic Bench
Decaying Picnic Bench – Olympus Trip 35 – Polypan F 50 – HC-110 Dil. B

Woodbine BridgeWoodbine Bridge – Olympus Trip 35 – Polypan F 50 – Ilfosol 3 1+14 A Man and His Camera
A Man and His Camera – Olympus Trip 35 – Polypan F 50 – Ilfosol 3 1+14

Here is Donna’s take on the Olympus OM2-n 35mm SLR.

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The Olympus OM2-n is a 35mm SLR that is super light and quite compact. The features it has allow you to either shoot in an “Automatic” mode or you can set it to fully manual. The shutter speed dial, like most Olympus SLRs, is located on the lens mount itself which allows for changing the speed easily. The camera also has a +2/-2 compensation dial, which means you can compensate manually for backlight if you needed to. However the camera will not allow you to meter for a lower exposure index than 12. Even if you set the EI dial to 12 you cannot turn the exposure compensation dial to allow for a slower film, you will have to meter using a handheld meter or use Sunny ƒ/16.
This camera is very lightweight and I can hold it for quite a while without feeling tired or fatigued. Also the lenses for this camera are top notch!
Another definite Recommended camera from the CCR!

Images from the camera are currently being developed and scanned in and will be posted at a future date/time.

The Darkroom

Today the group discusses odd-ball films, those films that aren’t your usual store bought film. So what’s in the bag?

Eastman 5363:

Produced by Eastman Kodak as a high-contrast title film for motion picture production this beautiful film can be developed as both a positive or a negative! It produces a very ‘chromey’ feel to the images. Alex has had good luck using HC-110 or PMK Pyro. Best shot at ASA-25 and is avalible through the Film Photography Project!

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 2Stratford Ontario – Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Eastman 5363 @ ASA-25 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. G 22:00 @ 20C Plattsburg, New York - Eastman 5363
Plattsburg, New York – Nikon F4 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Eastman 5363 @ ASA-25 – PMK Pyro (1+2+100) 11:00 @ 20C

Rollei Retro 80s:

Fine grain, very sharp, and did I mention that you can shoot it as Infrared with an IR 72 filter?

ir72

This example was shot on a Rolleiflex with an IR72 filter mounted.

It can be a very contrasty film, so a compensating developer like Rodinal at a high dilution is not a bad bet. I use 1+50 for 14 minutes @ 20 C / 68 F. Also, the latitude of this film is not huge; Treat it like slide film!

POLYPAN F:

With John talking about Rollei 80s (A fantastic film by the way, and one I (Mike) will happily admit to getting him hooked on) I talked about the wonderful Polypan F 50ASA film. It’s one of those specialty films, that is sadly gone from the world. I have enough to last me a bit more time, but not enough for my liking..

This film is amazing, though. For those that have used it, know what I am talking about. However those of you that haven’t, I’m sad to say that the stock of Polypan F has run out …. You might be able to find a few rolls here and there for sale . . .
Here are a few shots of the film with no anti-halation layer, where you can get your glow on!

Polypan MagicReaching For Tims

Late Night TeaShadow Of Life

Of course, the image I was mentioning in the PODCAST… I call this one.. ‘AURA‘ for… obvious reasons!

Aura

I also mentioned about the “REVERSAL PROCESS” on the podcast for B&W.. I will add a link to my blog regarding the “ROLL REVERSAL”

Roll Reversal – BLOG LINK

However, a small spot that I was informed by Kelly-Shane Fuller, is that when you develop the film, you do not DEVELOP for Normal.  You develop the hell out of it!
He suggested developing the film at 105°F for 14 minutes in HC-110 Dil. B..

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, or Film Plus if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario, if you’re on the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 7 – Traveling Light

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It’s the summer and what’s the best thing to do in the summer but travel, so with the gang on Summer vacation Classic Camera Revival host Alex Luyckx is coming to you live across the pond from the sun dappled French country side just outside of Vimy in France!

Have you Climbed the Ridge Where Canadians Died?

Cameras featured on Today’s Show…
Contax G2 – The only autofocus rangefinder out there, and one of Alex’s personal favourite cameras. While the autofocus is a bit iffy even manual focus is next to impossible, the camera makes up for it in being an easy to carry camera with great lenses to back it up!

CCR - Review 14 - Contax G2

The Field of Waterloo

The Field of WaterlooThe Field of Waterloo

Photos from Waterloo, Belgium – 200th Anniversary Reenactment
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 4:30 @ 20C

Nikon FM2 – The second version of the all mechanical FM camera, the Nikon FM2 puts power and rock solid performance in a lightweight SLR great for any travel need without breaking the bank!

400TX:365 - Week 33 - Reenactor Life400TX:365 - Week 33 - Reenactor Life

400TX:365 - Week 33 - Reenactor Life

Photos from the Siege of Fort Erie event – Fort Erie, ON Nikon FM2 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 4:30 @ 20C

Developing on the Road
Sometimes you just have to be able to get your black and white work developed while you’re on the road, while being in a more stable environment is preferred you can pretty much put your darkroom into a duffle bag and do your work in a hotel without too much difficulties!

  • Change Bag + Gloves
  • Stainless Steel Tank + Reels
  • Measuring containers
  • Chemistry: One-Shot is perferred, HC-110 syrup, Rodinal, Pyro, or Ilfosol 3
  • Water

But if you can find one a Jobo 2400 tank will allow you to load and develop with just the tank.

Alternately you can use a monobath developer such as New55’s R3 or mix it up yourself before One thing we did mention was a monobath, this is a single shot developer, stop, and fix. New55, the folks behind bringing back a Type 55 4×5 Instant film created one around Kodak’s HC-110 developer known as R03. You can pick it up directly from New55, or you can make it up yourself.For a 500mL tank you’ll need: 20ml Ilford Rapid Fixer, 32ml HC110 (Syrup), 100ml ammonia (5% solution), and 348ml water. You can read more about it at Michael Bartosek’s site or on the New55 Blog. From there it’s just a simple stand development, pour it in and let sit for 6-10 minutes using HP5 or Tri-X but you will need to heat the bath up to 24C.

Battle of Fort George - July 2015

Battle of Fort George - July 2015Battle of Fort George – Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – HC-M 10:00 @ 24C

What’s in Your Bag! Probably one of the hardest things for those who have a lot of cameras is picking which ones to bring along on a trip as well as all the other accessories that often going along with this.

The Waterloo Kit

  • Vanguard Up-Rise II 28 – A small compact bag that gives plenty of space for two cameras, extra lens, along with accessories!
  • Sony a6000 with a 16-50mm lens and a 50mm (Adapted Leica) – The replacement for my rather bulky Nikon D300 that actually has some better performance.
  • Contax G2 with 28mm and 45mm lenses – A 35mm camera means I can move quickly and have a little more versatility and get more images while carrying less film
  • Manfrotto – no selfie-sticks here, better to use a tripod to get those portraits of you in places.
  • Kaweco Classic Sport – A photographer doesn’t go anywhere without his trusty pen, in my case a fountain pen as I find them easier to use!
  • Sharpie Fine Tip – To write a serial code on the film canisters so I know what was shot where.
  • Life B6 Lined Notebook – My trip journal where I write about what’s been happening on my journeys through Europe.
  • Quo Vadis Habana Notebook – my daily notebook, what film I shot where, important details ect.

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, or Film Plus if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario, if you’re on the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 6 – Olympus Trip 35

Olympus seems to have a way of creating cult cameras and the Trip 35 is no different, this is a fantastic compact and fully automated camera that can fit in a pocket or bag. But don’t let the size give it away, the Trip 35 produces fantastic sharp images mostly thanks to the fantasic Zuiko lens. It’s a great way to get quality images in a compact camera.

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

The Dirt
Maker: Olympus
Model: Trip 35
Type: 35mm Point & Shoot Zone Focus
Lens: Fixed, Olympus D.Zuiko f=40mm 1:2.8 (Tessar Design)
Year of Manufacture: 1967-1984

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

The Good
No batteries here, the fully automated system can be used in any weather anywhere in the world without needing to seek out a camera store to get a battery. And as mentioned before the optics on the camera are fantastic for a compact point & shoot camera that produces sharp images at any aperture, and the 40mm focal length gives you a happy medium between the normal 50mm and the wide angle 28mm. Another feature that I really like about the camera is the red flag, this flag will let you know that there’s not enough light to actually take a photo, and to put on a flash (there is a hotshoe and PC socket).

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

The Bad
Like any camera with a selenium meter there’s a chance that the older models will start to suffer from the meter being burned out, mine is an earlier model but still going strong. There is also little in the way you can do a manual override, sure you can easily change the aperture on the camera, but having only two shutter speeds (1/40″ or 1/250″) there’s little adaptation you can do. But if you’re out shooting with the Trip 35, good chance you’re just leaving it in automatic. And finally zone focus, if you have poor spacial reckoning this might be an issue, although the focus icons (mountain, three bloaks, two bloaks, one bloak ect) do make it easy, you also have the actual distance scale, which for me is helpful.

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

The Low Down
If you like to travel light without loosing image quality the Trip 35 is for you, but make sure you are able to test the camera fully first! You don’t want to find one that has a burned out meter, or non-working red flag. But if you have a good camera, it really won’t let you down honestly. I’ve been running the camera for several years, not as much as I should be, but have never had a bad image out of the camera. It’s a great exercise in limiting yourself.

All Photos shot along College Street in Toronto, Ontario
Olympus Trip 35 – Olympus D.Zuiko f=40mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ – Ilford DD-X (1+4) 10:00 @ 20C