CCR:FRB – Review 17 – Rollei RPX 100

CCR:FRB – Review 17 – Rollei RPX 100

The middle-of-the-road film stock in the RPX line and another fantastic entry. Like RPX 25, RPX 100 is the spiritual successor to Agfa APX 100. While I don’t have much experience with APX 100 (I have about 50 sheets of the stuff in 4×5), the film is similar in look to Kodak TMax 100. And actually, you can use some of the TMax 100 times with RPX 100. While it’s no FP4+, I actually think RPX 100 is slightly better than Kodak TMax 100 mostly because of the huge latitude on the film, in fact, you can even do the Panatomic-X trick and shoot the film at ASA-32 and amazing results!

CCR:FRB - Review 17 - Rollei RPX 100

Film Specs
Type: Panchromatic Black & White
Film Base: Polyester (PE)
Film Speed: ASA-100, Latitude: 25-800
Formats Avaliable: 35mm, 120, 4×5

Roll 01 – Rollei RPX-D
Like Kodak’s TMax developer, Rollei released their RPX-D developer for the RPX 100 and RPX 400 films. And while using the developer will cost you, as it’s not available in every store, it provides amazing results with the film. From the smooth tones and fine grain, and like TMax films in TMax developer I honestly feel RPX-D is made perfectly for RPX 100, more so than RPX 400. Of course, the biggest issue is that you do need to purchase the developer from speciality online stores and the bottle isn’t that big.

52:500c - Week 04 - A Fort for A City52:500c - Week 04 - A Fort for A City52:500c - Week 04 - A Fort for A City52:500c - Week 04 - A Fort for A City

Technical Details:
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Distagon 50mm 1:4 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100
Rollei RPX-D (1+15) 6:30 @ 20C

Roll 02 – Kodak D-76
Like it’s position in the RPX line, RPX 100 is my second favourite film from the lineup. And you know, D-76 only solidifies that place you get a beautiful image that is far from boring, the contrast is there, the tonal range is there and you know you get a decently sharp image on top of all that. While in the sky areas you see a bit more grain, it isn’t anything to worry about it actually looks decent. And while you could tone down the contrast by going 1+1 or using Kodak D-23. I think the stock looks better.

CCR:FRB - Review 17 - Rollei RPX 100 - Roll 03 (Kodak D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 17 - Rollei RPX 100 - Roll 03 (Kodak D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 17 - Rollei RPX 100 - Roll 03 (Kodak D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 17 - Rollei RPX 100 - Roll 03 (Kodak D-76)

Technical Details:
Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100
Kodak D-76 (Stock) 8:30 @ 20C

Roll 03 – Rodinal
Another win for RPX 100, and along the same lines of RPX-D, Rodinal does right by RPX 100. You get the same fine grain smooth tones and contrast. And well I think, RPX 100 responds far better to Rodinal than TMax 100. Another interesting point is that it doesn’t matter if you use 1+25 or 1+50 there’s very little difference between them in how the film responds, it again depends on how much time you have. Though I do think, the 1+25 will give you a slightly sharper image.

52:500c - Week 37 - Shaken, Not Stirred52:500c - Week 37 - Shaken, Not Stirred52:500c - Week 37 - Shaken, Not Stirred52:500c - Week 37 - Shaken, Not Stirred

Techincal Details:
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Ziess Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100
Blazinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20C

Roll 04 – Kodak HC-110
Out of all the developers I used with RPX 100, personally, HC-110 remains my personal favourite. A well-rounded film needs a well-rounded developer, and while HC-110 is known to bump up the contrast in most films, it isn’t too bad on RPX 100, rather you get the same results as you would in any other developer. Not to mention the same smooth tones and fine grain images. While the sharpness is a bit less, it’s far from noticeable, but you do get an uptick in grain.

52:500c - Week 31 - Vieux-Québec52:500c - Week 31 - Vieux-Québec52:500c - Week 31 - Vieux-Québec52:500c - Week 31 - Vieux-Québec

Technical Details:
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 9:00 @ 20C

Final Thoughts
When it comes to RPX 100, I have so many other films on the same time that I love shooting, Ilford FP4+, of course, being top of the list, but if I had to pick a film to replace say Kodak TMax 100 or even Delta 100 I would go with RPX 100. It’s readily available in physical stores and easily obtained online. Plus it carries on that spirit of the APX line of films. I actually have 50 sheets of APX 100 in 4×5 waiting to be shot hopefully this summer. Not to mention RPX 100 does really well if you use TMax 100 times, even the Panatomic-X trick.

#photochat – 14 June 2018 – Selling Gear

#photochat – 14 June 2018 – Selling Gear

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 14 June 2018 is about Selling Gear!

Question 1 – How do you go about selling off your gear?
Question 2 – Do you ever get Seller’s Remorse?
Question 3 – What makes you want to sell off some gear?
Question 4 – How do you set the price on your gear?
Question 5 – Share any gear you’ve recently off-loaded!

Past topics have included: Buying Gear, Infrared, Getting the Shot (2018), Power of Photography, Photographic Evolution, Photography Projects (2018), Mobile Technologies, Black & White Photography (2018), Colour Photography (2018), Photographic Perks, Buying a New Camera, Optics, Keep it Simple, Accessories, Helping Out, Battle Damage, Ultrawide Angle, All About the Love, Podcasts, What’s in your Bag (2018), Self-Improvement, Snapshots, Exposure Troubles, Street Photography (2017), Event Photography, Photographic Gifts, Film Photography (2017), Photographic Annoyances, Locations, Strange Habits, Collaboration, Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, why are you a photographer, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

CCR:FRB – Review 16 – Rollei RPX 25

CCR:FRB – Review 16 – Rollei RPX 25

Through 2016 I did a 52-Roll project where I shot the Rollei RPX films for each week, out of the three flavours available my personal favourite remained RPX 25, a spiritual successor to the iconic Agfa APX 25. These days in film photography there aren’t many offerings below ASA-100, Pan F+ is a solid choice, but sometimes you want something sharp, fine-grained, and slow. And for that, you have Rollei RPX 25. While the thin polyester base might make it hard to handle in the bag and widely thin in sheet formats, the results are worth the trouble.

CCR:FRB - Review 16 - Rollei RPX 25

Film Specs
Type: Panchromatic B&W
Film Base: Polyester (PE)
Film Speed: ASA-25, Latitude: 12-50
Formats Avaliable: 35mm, 120, 4×5

Roll 01 – Rodinal
Where best to start with a slow film known for its sharpness is Rodinal. And honestly, it doesn’t matter which dilution you use, 1+25 or 1+50 it depends on how much time you have to develop it. You see clearly the fine-grained nature of the film and the sharpness. I mean the negatives are sharp enough to cut yourself on. Plus you see a touch of the extended red-sensitivity in the film as you get the darkened blue skies.

52:500c - Week 21 - Welcome to the Roc52:500c - Week 21 - Welcome to the Roc52:500c - Week 21 - Welcome to the Roc52:500c - Week 21 - Welcome to the Roc

Technical Details:
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Distagon 50mm 1:4 – Rollei RPX 25 @ ASA-25
Blazinal (1+25) 6:00 @ 20C

Roll 02 – Kodak D-76
Sometimes you want a film to be sharp, sometimes you want it to be soft. For the most part, RPX 25 is a sharp film, yet in D-76 it tones down the razor sharp edge, but don’t think this is a bad thing. The film itself is fairly high-contrast, not so much here, the contrast is toned down to a pleasing level but you don’t lose the tonal range at the same time. In generally I rather like RPX 25 in D-76 if I’m looking for a more normal look rather than a deathly sharp contrasty punch in the face you tend to get. If I had to pick a word, smooth comes to mind.

CCR:FRB - Review 16 - Rollei RPX 25 - Roll 2 (D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 16 - Rollei RPX 25 - Roll 2 (D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 16 - Rollei RPX 25 - Roll 2 (D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 16 - Rollei RPX 25 - Roll 2 (D-76)

Technical Details:
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Biogon 2,8/28 T* – Rollei RPX 25 @ ASA-25
Kodak D-76 (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Roll 03 – Kodak HC-110
When you have a film stock this fine, you really don’t need to be concerned about the developer, and honestly, think HC-110 works well on the film. While I used the B dilution, looking back I think the film would look even better with E or even H. You do get a crank up on the contrast you don’t lose the fine-grain or sharpness with the film and as an everyday developer for the film, you cannot beat HC-110.

52:500c - Week 41 - Battle Ground52:500c - Week 41 - Battle Ground52:500c - Week 41 - Battle Ground52:500c - Week 41 - Battle Ground

Techincal Details:
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Rollei RPX 25 @ ASA-25
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

Roll 04 – Pyrocat-HD
So when working with slow, fine-grained films, there are some developers that you just know are going to make the film sing, and with RPX 25 the one developer I knew I had to try with the large format version of the film, Pyrocat-HD remained developer number one. And the wait was well worth it. Any grain that even showed up earlier is gone, I mean I don’t even want to try and print this film as I don’t know how well I could get it in focus. You have insanely sharp images that will blow you away. Not to mention a tonal range to die for.

Mill Water FallsThe Leftovers7.7 cm Feldkanone 96 neuer ArtThe Prison Yard

Technical Details:
Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Multiple Lenses – Rollei RPX 25 @ ASA-25
Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 12:00 @ 20C

Final Thoughts
I honestly say, having RPX 25 available these days is wonderful, as I never got to shoot APX 25 in anything other than 35mm, and now that I can shoot it in 120 and 4×5 if I need that slow speed in the summer or to get that rich velvet of running water I can. While the film’s latitude isn’t the best, you don’t really expect much from a slow film. If I want latitude I’ll shoot 100 or even 400 films before a slow film. And the best part is that the RPX line is available through most brick-and-mortar photography stores and online through Maco Direct or Argentix.

CCR Review 90 – Canon EOS Elan 7NE

CCR Review 90 – Canon EOS Elan 7NE

I’m a Nikon shooter and have shot a lot of Nikon Cameras, but that doesn’t mean I don’t appreciate a fine Canon. Of the modern Canon EOS cameras, I’ve shot the Elan 7ne is probably the best camera, I mean I’d take this over an EOS-1. But the Elan 7n/7ne are unique cameras in my view, one of a few the others being the Canon T90 and Nikon F90. These cameras have the specs and could very well be professional models but often are left aside. But if the three, the Elan 7ne would get the most publicity, but to be honest, if I had one land in my lap, I wouldn’t say no to keep it. Thanks to Mike Bitaxi for loaning this beauty out!

CCR Review 90 - Canon EOS Elan 7NE

The Dirt
Make: Canon
Model: EOS Elan 7NE (EOS 30V/EOS 7S)
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Canon EF Mount
Year of Manufacture: 2004

CCR Review 90 - Canon EOS Elan 7NECCR Review 90 - Canon EOS Elan 7NE

The Good
The first frame I shot on the camera my first instinct said, man, this is a smooth operating camera. Everything just works and works well. From loading the film to turning it on and operating the camera. The size, weight, and general feel of the camera make it ideal for shooting on a regular and daily basis, one thing that I had an issue with more consumer-oriented Canon cameras was the handgrip, far too narrow, but on the Elan 7ne, it’s perfect and reminds me of my old Nikon D70s or Nikon D300. The control layout is decent, with the main command dial right by the shutter release and the thumb wheel nicely placed so you can operate the camera, even in manual mode single-handed.

CCR Review 90 - Canon EOS Elan 7NECCR Review 90 - Canon EOS Elan 7NE

The Bad
There’s really only a couple things that I don’t really like on this camera. First off is where the on/off control is as part of the mode dial. Honestly, I don’t know why they did that. Having to not only turn on the camera but then remember to return to your mode is a bit odd to me. I personally would have preferred a separate on/off switch. While not a major dig at the camera, I find it more of an annoyance. The second annoyance is the eye-control, I ended up having to turn the feature off, which I’m glad you can. I can understand why such a system would be nice being able to look and have the camera focus, but honestly, I tried to get it to work and it didn’t. Not sure if I was doing it wrong or the system itself is flawed. As I said, at least you can turn it off and manually set the focus points.

CCR Review 90 - Canon EOS Elan 7NECCR Review 90 - Canon EOS Elan 7NE

The Lowdown
You don’t need to jump on an Elan 7ne, the original Elan 7n will do you just fine. As I said in the introduction the Elan 7n/ne is a camera that occupies a unique section of SLRs, when you started to see more advanced cameras that aren’t aimed at the professional but more the advanced amateur those who love photography and desire that higher-end camera but don’t have the budget. Now if you’re looking for a good spot to start in 35mm film cameras and already have the EF (not EF-S) than an Elan 7n would be a solid camera to start with as it does have a very similar look and feel to most digital SLRs offered up from Canon. Plus, even on the used market, they can be had for a fair price.

All Photos Taken along the Historic Welland Canal, Ontario, Canada
Canon EOS Elan 7NE – Canon Zoom Lens EF 28-90mm 1:4-5.6 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100
Kodak D-76 (1+1) 9:30 @ 20C

#photochat – 7 June 2018 – Buying Gear

#photochat – 7 June 2018 – Buying Gear

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 7 June 2018 is about Buying Gear!

Question 1 – Do you purchase gear only from specific stores?
Question 2 – What made you decide to make your last major gear purchase?
Question 3 – Do you always buy new or is used an option?
Question 4 – Do you buy quality and pay more, or buy inexpensive and sacrifice quality?
Question 5 – Share any recent gear purchases, and why you bought it!

Past topics have included: Infrared, Getting the Shot (2018), Power of Photography, Photographic Evolution, Photography Projects (2018), Mobile Technologies, Black & White Photography (2018), Colour Photography (2018), Photographic Perks, Buying a New Camera, Optics, Keep it Simple, Accessories, Helping Out, Battle Damage, Ultrawide Angle, All About the Love, Podcasts, What’s in your Bag (2018), Self-Improvement, Snapshots, Exposure Troubles, Street Photography (2017), Event Photography, Photographic Gifts, Film Photography (2017), Photographic Annoyances, Locations, Strange Habits, Collaboration, Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, why are you a photographer, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

Toronto Film Shooters Meetup – Spring 2018

Toronto Film Shooters Meetup – Spring 2018

It’s been just under a year since the gang visited the Riverdale/Leslieville areas of Toronto. And again I found myself as a participant in the walk rather than the organiser. For that, I left it up to Bill Smith who knows the area like the back of his hand, though this time around we took a much different route. There’s something about getting started early as we gathered at the Rooster Coffee House for our start, after an Atomic Rooster Brew and some discussion. And of course, snapping photos with our cups of coffee and our cameras we started off.

Bill and the FLeicamanUp in SmokeJohn

The day had promised to be a scorcher, thankfully the humidity was not as bad as predicted, which made life easier especially lugging around camera gear. We didn’t even blink at the Old Don Jail that had a massive lineup outside it already for a Doors Open Tour, we were more interested in moving rather than jockeying for shots inside the old jail. Across the Don Valley and into a rather odd feature of the city, Riverdale Farm. A strange little pocket of history that Toronto makes Toronto rather unique, from there it was into the beautiful areas of Cabbage Town with grand old homes that still carried some of their historic charms.

Riverdale TunnelGoats?The Grand HouseCatholic

The group remained fairly elastic often trailing across maybe half a kilometre each person seeing something different in the area to capture or just sticking to the social aspects of the meetup. I went a bit bigger on gear than I usually do, bringing the Nikon F5 along with the standard lens trio, 35, 50, and 105. Giving me a bit more range to capture wide to close. The day was bright, and I really should have just stuck to the slower films I had packed and left the FP4+ for another day.

Row Upon RowHam!Didn't See AnythingYing & Yang

Despite the late departure, we made a good time, being able to poke our head into an area of the city that I haven’t always visited before ended at the Stout Irish Pub (great food, great beer). And while some decided to head back to the Rooster I needed to get to Saulter Street in a far quicker manner before heading into the Downtown for chemistry at Downtown Camera and be home in time to make up dinner! If you want to join the Toronto Film Shooters, our next photo walk takes place on the 21st of July at 3 pm, meeting at the Exchange Brewery (7 Queen Street, Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario) more details can be found on the Facebook Event.

#photochat – 31 May 2018 – Infrared

#photochat – 31 May 2018 – Infrared

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 31 May 2018 is about Infrared Photography!

Question 1 – Have you ever shot Infrared Photography (Digital or Film)?
Question 1b – Why did you or why don’t you?
Question 2 – What technique did you use to achieve the results? (Digital Converted, Filter, Film?)
Question 3 – Why do you like and what don’t you like about Infrared?
Question 4 – What subjects do you feel work best with Infrared?
Question 5 – Share any photos you’ve taken using IR Techniques

Past topics have included: Getting the Shot (2018), Power of Photography, Photographic Evolution, Photography Projects (2018), Mobile Technologies, Black & White Photography (2018), Colour Photography (2018), Photographic Perks, Buying a New Camera, Optics, Keep it Simple, Accessories, Helping Out, Battle Damage, Ultrawide Angle, All About the Love, Podcasts, What’s in your Bag (2018), Self-Improvement, Snapshots, Exposure Troubles, Street Photography (2017), Event Photography, Photographic Gifts, Film Photography (2017), Photographic Annoyances, Locations, Strange Habits, Collaboration, Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, why are you a photographer, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

Doors Open Hamilton – A Return

Doors Open Hamilton – A Return

My first experience with a Doors Open event took place in 2007 in Hamilton, wow, I’ve been doing these for over ten years now. I learned of it through the Urban Exploration community. And really there’s no surprise there, explorers do love getting a view of places we normally can’t. And frankly, there’s no better way to do that than legal tours. And while these days I don’t go with a big group, I still enjoy getting out to the Toronto or Hamilton event. Sometimes even both if I can work it. There was even a year I went to Guelph’s and I helped run a Doors Open location for my home church during the Milton event. But Hamilton has always held a special place for me, mostly because it always lands on my birthday weekend. Unlike last year where the weather was awful, this year the weather on Saturday was perfect and at my wife’s idea, I took my father-in-law along for the ride. All but one location were new to me, and most featured the theme of restoration and reuse. Eucharist Church is a new congregation that is bringing new life to the 1893 First Romanian Baptist Church, reviving a sanctuary that had not seen use in twenty years. Gibson School and Cannon Knitting Mills are both centuries-old buildings that are being given new leases on life as Condos and Event space, much to the anger of many in the surrounding communities, but that is a discussion not for this blog. The old Customs House saved from demolition and now celebrates Hamilton’s industrial history, and of course, the beautiful art deco Toronto, Hamilton & Buffalo Station that continues to serve as a GO station and a museum to the city’s rail history.

DO:H 2018 - Eucharist ChurchDO:H 2018 - Gibson SchoolDO:H 2018 - Cannon Knitting MillDO:H 2018 - Customs HouseDO:H 2018 - Hamilton GO Centre

While I also visited three additional locations, the Hamilton Port Authority, Royal Hamilton Yacht Club, and an old Maintenance Warehouse they really didn’t fit and were more bonus locations. If you want to see all the images, you can check them out over on my Flickr collection!

All Photos taken with:
Sony a6000 + Sony E PZ 16-50mm 1:3.5-5.6 OSS

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 41 – Pick Your Poison

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 41 – Pick Your Poison

ccr-logo-leaf

In all cases, it’s all about picking the right gear for the job, so this episode the gang talks about the cameras they use when they’re in specific situations from street photography to travel, sports to portrait work. It’s all about picking the right poison for the job.

Portraiture – James is an amazing portrait photographer who has done hundreds of wedding and even taught on the subject. And while he does shoot plenty of digital images when out doing portrait work he uses a few film cameras. The iconic Hasselblad 503 and more importantly the Carl Zeiss Sonar 150mm f/4 lens and the other being the Nikon F6 with the AF-S Nikkor 85mm f/1.4G lens. For Mike, however, being a loving father, he does most of the portraits of his kids using his trusty Canon AE-1 and a 50mm lens.

Remembering When...

Travel – Most of the gang have the travel bug. And at least three of us are huge fans of New York City. And when travelling, especially by air you have to keep your kit fairly compact. For Bill, he mostly works with the compact Olympus OM-1n for 35mm and the Rolleicord IV to cover off medium format work. Alex’s travel camera of choice especially for New York City is the Nikon FA with the MD-15 motor drive attached. But it’s the lenses that truly make the trip and it’s the three lens kit that he takes no matter the camera, a wide angle (24/28/35), a normal (50), and a short telephoto (85/105/135) to round it out. Both Alex and Bill use messenger style bags, Domke for Bill and the Peak Design Everyday Messanger for Alex.

Inside the TerraceAn Empire of ThoughtsLast Look at TriBeCaShadow Cable on the Brooklyn Bridge

Street – Street photography is one of those genres that tend to polarize people on the gear that should be used and how it’s to be done. But for John, it’s all about comfort and for that, it’s the Voigtlander Bessa R3m and with a 35mm lens, he finds he can wander around and stay out of the notice of his subjects, wide enough to catch the moment, yet not too wide to lose the subject. As for the manual focus, he sets the lens to f/8 and sets the focus and forgets it and let’s hyperfocal distance do its thing. Also, the camera is easy on his back.

View from Banff Springs hotelSteel and ConcreteOutside a Glasgow Art Gallery

Sport – Our newest addition to the team, Trevor, has a lot to share when it comes to the professional side of photography. He even got some shooting in during the last time the Toronto Blue Jays won the World Series in 1993! And for that, the camera of choice is the Nikon F4 with the 80-200mm f/2.8D lens. The camera and the lens gave him all the reach he needed to catch the action of the first base line.

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

#photochat – 24 May 2018 – Getting the Shot

#photochat – 24 May 2018 – Getting the Shot

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 24 May 2018 is about Getting the Shot!

Question 1 – To what extremes will you go to get the shot?
Question 2 – If you’re going into an unknown situation for a shoot what is your go-to camera/lens/media?
Question 3 – How do you set exposure in those situations?
Question 4 – When you get the shot, is the effort worth it?
Question 5 – Share that one shot that you love, but took some effort to get!

Past topics have included: Power of Photography, Photographic Evolution, Photography Projects (2018), Mobile Technologies, Black & White Photography (2018), Colour Photography (2018), Photographic Perks, Buying a New Camera, Optics, Keep it Simple, Accessories, Helping Out, Battle Damage, Ultrawide Angle, All About the Love, Podcasts, What’s in your Bag (2018), Self-Improvement, Snapshots, Exposure Troubles, Street Photography (2017), Event Photography, Photographic Gifts, Film Photography (2017), Photographic Annoyances, Locations, Strange Habits, Collaboration, Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, why are you a photographer, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.