Tag: Eastman 5363

Ottawa on Film

Ottawa on Film

One of my favourite cities in Ontario to photograph is Ottawa, Ontario, also the Capital City of Canada. While not as grandiose in planning as Washington DC, this city has plenty of offer the photographer. A recent week’s holiday there with my wife gave me a chance to exersize several cameras from my toolkit and having plenty of my pro gear having shot a weekend before hand I was loaded for bear both in gear and film stock.

Alexandra Bridge
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Eastman 5363 @ ASA-25
Kodak HC-110 Dil. F 5:00 @ 20C

End of Line
Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – ORWO UN54 @ ASA-100
Kodak HC-110 Dil. H 7:30 @ 20C

Day One found us going to the newly renovated Museum of Canadian History in Gatineau then across the river for lunch. Having been blessed with a sunny week I decided to keep most of my film stocks on the slower side, most rating no more than ASA-100. It also saw a return of Eastman 5363 a favourite motion picture stock that I did extensive tests with the first time it came to the still photography market through the Film Photography Project.

Spike in Blue Sky
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Bergger Pancro 400 @ ASA-400
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 9:00 @ 20C

More Old Hydro Systems
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Bergger Pancro 400 @ ASA-400
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 9:00 @ 20C

Another film that I gave a try with, and only the second time shooting in 120 is Bergger Pancro 400, a new film stock out of France from a company better known for their traditional photo paper I was fairly pleased with the stock. This time around I shot it at the full speed of ASA-400 just so that shooting at waist level I could get some deep depth of field and fast shutter speeds. While a little more grainy than I was expecting from a 400-speed film in medium format I am fairly pleased with the results.

MosaïCanada 150
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 (Orange-22) – ORWO UN54 @ ASA-100
Kodak HC-110 Dil. H 7:30 @ 20C

MosaïCanada 150
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 (Orange-22) – ORWO UN54 @ ASA-100
Kodak HC-110 Dil. H 7:30 @ 20C

While if you’re a following of this blog, you’ve already seen some of the film shots from Day Four through my review of the Holga 120N. But after the National Gallery, which has a beautiful photography exhibit at the moment, I swung up my trusty Nikon F2 Photomic. With blue skies and white clouds, it was time to get some filtering on the camera. While the MosaïCanada 150 display was begging for some Infrared work, I was rather pleased with the results of the Orange-22 filter.

The Victoria Bell
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Fomapan 100 @ ASA-100
Blazinal (1+50) 9:00 @ 20C

The Bank of Canada
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Fomapan 100 @ ASA-100
Blazinal (1+50) 9:00 @ 20C

The final day saw us kicking around Parliament Hill. Sadly I had to check my bag and Nikon F5 for the tour of Parliament and the Changing of the guard, I made a point to head back with the ultra-wide lens and some Fomapan 100, a beautiful film that I had yet to shoot in 35mm, to capture the seat of power for Canada. When I’ve run a project I like to keep the film stocks fairly consistent. And while I did make sure to bring multiples of two (mostly), I use vacations as a time to play around with new/odd film stocks, sometimes it turned out great. Other times not so much.

The Big Eastman 5363 Roundup

The Big Eastman 5363 Roundup

It all started when I was asked to test some new motion picture film for the Film Photography Project, and I found a new favourite slow film…that film is Eastman 5363 Positive Film II. A high contrast motion picture film specifically designed for the creation of titles and can be processed as a positive film or a negative film. But could it be used for regular pictorial work. I immediately got to work on shooting and making some developing choices. While I have written about this film a few times before I’ll be working my way from the beginning to the end of my experimentation of this fantastic film. My first choice of developer was Xtol, I figured the film may respond similar to another high contrast Kodak film, SO-331, and shooting the film at a speed of ASA-50. I used Xtol as a stock solution and developed the film for five minutes at 20 degrees Celsius.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 1 - High Park

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 1 - High Park

The results were notable under exposed, but there were images there, so the Xtol would work it would just need maybe another minute in the developer, or shot at a slower speed. But since this was a working experiment, rather than pursue the Xtol route, I switched gears to HC-110. I happened across some photos on Flickr by friend and fellow film nut and FPP staffer Leslie shooting the film at ASA-25, and developing in Dilution G.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 2

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 2

The results were, much better after a 22 minute development cycle in Dilution G and a speed of 25. Now I did this simply because I wanted some benchmark of how I wanted the film to look. While maintaining some chromy feel (it can be developed as positive) and a high-contrast look while maintaining some midtones. The Dilution G worked wonderfully. So for my next roll I dropped the speed another stop to ASA-12 and went for a stand developing method, using Blazinal (a Canadian version of Rodinal) at 1+100 for 1 hour, every fifteen minutes I would give the tank two inversions.

Eastman 5363 - Test Roll 3

Eastman 5363 - Test Roll 3

As you can see, we’re starting to get some great shadow detail and fantastic mid-tones, but the highlights are completely blown out, but for a starting point the stand developing is good idea but a shorter time or doing a 1+200 dilution for an hour might bring back some of the highlights while preserving the shadows and midtones. But I was ready to move onto a developer that I had just started working with and would eventually replace Rodinal, PMK Pyro. While a staining developer it was also a compensating developer and I was really liking the results I was getting on Tri-X, Efke, and Agfa films. The next roll of film I exposed again at ASA-25, which I was seeing was the ‘sweet spot’ for 5363. Next up was trying to decide on a starting point for developing time. Efke 25 has a time of 7 and a half minutes, while most films are within the 10 to 11 minute mark. The dilution was easy, I’ll use the standard 1+2+100. The first roll I went with a 10 minute developing time.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 4 - Niagara-On-The-Lake

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 4 - Niagara-On-The-Lake

We have results, although underexposed, but after some tweaking in Photoshop with the curves I was able to pull out some details, there was that nice chrome feel that I got with the HC-110. So now it was simply a matter of tweaking the developing times. So for the next roll I bumped it up thirty seconds.

Eastman 5363 Test - Robert

Eastman 5363 Test - Chill

A little better but still ever so slightly under exposed, again curves in Photoshop helped bring out the details. But this is a fantastic film for portraits giving a really unique look. Then on an episode of the FPP the gang was discussing the sensitivity of the film, Mike had done some work under hot lights and a yellow filter and got a blank roll. As it turned out the film is blue light sensitive, so using tungsten lights and a yellow filter he had all but cut out the blue light hitting the film. So it was again Leslie suggested the idea about adding a blue filter onto the camera lens to see if that would improve the midtones. So my next roll I not only added a blue filter but gave another thirty seconds on the developing time.

Eastman 5363 In Downtown Soo

Eastman 5363 In Downtown Soo

I don’t know if it was the filter, or the fact I was shooting nearly wide open that gave a softness to the film, but there were certainly midtones back on the film but gone was the chrome feel of the film. So the developing time I settled on the 11 minute mark, but I certainly did not like having a blue filter on the film. It really only acted as a Neutral Density filter than anything. So for the final roll I removed filter.

Plattsburg, New York - Eastman 5363

Plattsburg, New York - Eastman 5363

And there it was, wonderfully exposed and developed negs with midtones and that chrome feel was back. It only took seven rolls of the film before I managed to figure it out. Other users of the film have been getting good results with Technodol, Xtol, and D-76. It’s a fantastic slow film that gives you that feel of a black and white slide film without it actually being a slide film. It’s sharp, fine grained, and makes for unique portraits. While not an everyday film, it certainaly adds a touch of magic. If you’re interested in trying this film out for yourself, you can pick it up through the FPP Store, just follow this link: Eastman 5363 Single Roll at the FPP Store.

Eastman 5363 Positive Film II – Once More into the Breach

Eastman 5363 Positive Film II – Once More into the Breach

Another care package of new film stocks arrived from the FPP recently, some Russian Films, Japanese and two Kodak rolls, one being the fantastic Eastman 5363! Although my last test roll ended up in failure (Rodinal 1+100, stand developed for an hour). I was looking forwarding to trying another formula. By this point the gang had decided that ASA-25 was the optimal speed for this film. I’ve seen lots of examples popping up on Flickr with D-76 (1+1), Xtol (1+1), HC-110 Dilution G, even some home brewed positive developing with Dektol as a second developer.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 4 - Niagara-On-The-Lake
The Secord home in Queenston, ON

But what about PMK Pyro? PMK has become a bit of a staple in my chemistry closet for developing, and I’m loving this staining developer, sure the developing times are a bit longer than normal, but it makes Tri-X sing, along with Efke and Adox films. So why not try it out on the Eastman 5363. But how long should the film go into tank for? I poked around the massive dev chart for other ASA-25 times, looking at Efke films and Agfa films for some ideas. Efke times are at 7.5 minutes where as APX25 is 11 minutes. Most PMK Pyro times are within that range. So I took a page from Michael Raso’s book and settled on PMK Pyro (1+2+100) dilution (standard) for 10 minutes.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 4 - Niagara-On-The-Lake
Grand Old Home in Niagara-On-The-Lake, ON

Development technique remains my standard, constant agitation (inversion method) for the first minute, then ten seconds every minute after. One minute water stop bath, constant agitation, then five minutes in Kodak Rapid Fixer with Hardener following the same agitation method as developing. Then two minutes in the spent developer with constant agitation. Followed by a wash, Ilford Method, with Photoflo added to the final 40 inversions, then hung to dry, scanning with an Epson V700.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 4 - Niagara-On-The-Lake
The Prince of Wales Hotel – Niagara-On-The-Lake, ON

Overall, the negs are a touch under exposed, could’ve used maybe another minute or so in the developer, or add a degree or two to the developer temperature, but that’s what these tests are all about. But again you get this great high-contrast chrome feel to the images. So we can add another good developer to the mix, just with a bit of a tweak on the time. Interested in trying this beautiful film out? You can pick up rolls here at the FPP Store. Have another way of developing it? Let me know via email, or contact the FPP directly.

Long Live Film!

Photos: Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Eastman 5363 Positive Film II @ ASA-25 – PMK Pyro (1+2+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Eastman 5363 Positive Film II

Eastman 5363 Positive Film II

Back in December I was approached by Michael Raso of the Film Photography Project if I wanted to help test a new (to the FPP) film stock. Just before Christmas the film arrived with a little note saying “ASA-6, we think” there was no real indication online how to develop this film in traditional B&W chemistry or it’s exact sensitivity. Google yielded a document by Eastman Kodak on this film stock, Eastman 5363 Positive Film II was a high contrast motion picture film designed for the creation of both positive and negative titles for films. And to develop using Kodak’s D-97 chemistry. Last time I checked I couldn’t just walk into my usual camera shop, Burlington Camera and get D-97. So I had to go with my gut, what other high-contrast film had I used from Kodak’s Motion picture line. The first thing that came into my head was the John Meadow’s found SO-331!

The first roll I shot in High Park in Toronto at ASA-50 (I meant to shoot it at ASA-25) I really wasn’t convinced at the ASA-6 rating and I really didn’t want to have to lug a tripod around that day. Plus I figured as a motion picture film it would have a pretty wide latitude. Besides I still had two other rolls to shoot so why not? After shooting it I got it home and developed it in Kodak Xtol, Stock Solution for 5 minutes (per times for SO-331 at ASA-50), constant agitation for the first minute, then 10 seconds for each following minute. Water stop with constant agitation for a full minute. Then Kodafix Rapid Fixer with Hardener for five minutes following the same agitation pattern as with developing. Then two minutes in Kodak Hypoclear, then washed using the Ilford wash method, straight water for the first three cycles, then Photoflo introduced for the final cycle. The results very very contrasty image, pure B&W very little in the way of midtones but rather unique all the same.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 1 - High Park

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 1 - High Park

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 1 - High Park

The second roll I shot in downtown Stratford at ASA-25. But this time I went with a forumula developed by friend and fellow FPP Volunteer and all around awesome lady Leslie from Imagine That! and the Mecca. HC-110 Dilution G (1+29 from the stock solution) for 22 minutes. Constant agitation for the first minute, then 10 seconds for each following minute. Water stop with constant agitation for a full minute. Then Kodafix Rapid Fixer with Hardener for five minutes following the same agitation pattern as with developing. Then two minutes in Kodak Hypoclear, then washed using the Ilford wash method, straight water for the first three cycles, then Photoflo introduced for the final cycle. Much cleaner results, and a very metallic chrome feel to the image. Still High Contrast but with more mid-tones.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 2

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 2

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 2

The third roll was also shot in Stratford, and since I still had lots of sun I decided to knock it down one more stop to ASA-12. Developing this time I took a huge step and went a bit crazy, stand developing. I used Blazinal (the locally available Rodinal blend) at 1+100, and stand developed for one hour. Constant agitation for the first minute, then two inversions every 15 minutes. Water stop with constant agitation for a full minute. Then Kodafix Rapid Fixer with Hardener for five minutes following the same agitation pattern as with developing. Then two minutes in Kodak Hypoclear, then washed using the Ilford wash method, straight water for the first three cycles, then Photoflo introduced for the final cycle. The results…failure. Everything was way over exposed that I didn’t even bother scanning it in. But when it comes to testing a new film stock failures are bound to happen, and that means that the other testers can work from there to make it better.

This film does work at ASA-6 as well, Michael Raso has had great luck with D-76 at 1+1 for 12 minutes. Over all I rather like this film, it’s a great slow speed film and has a lot of potential for unique landscapes and crazy portraiture. If you want to try this film out you can pick up rolls at the FPP store! Have other ideas on how it could be processed, please feel free to contact me by email, or you can contact the FPP directly.

High Park Photos: Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T*
Stratford Photos: Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Biogon 2,8/28 T*