If the Maxxum 5000 was a Crystler Reliant then the Maxxum 7000 is a LeBaron. While both are still k-cars, the 7000 certainly does it with a little more style. While the 7000 marked a major shift in how cameras operated and how a photographer operated them, gone are the dials and leavers of the old generation, screens, buttons, and autofocus now dominated the market. Now the 7000 was not the first autofocus camera, but it was the first autofocus system built that way from the ground up. (Canon, Nikon, and Pentax had built an AF system that used old systems). The Dirt Make: MinoltaRead More →

They came on in the same old way, and we defeated them in the same old way. – Field Marshal Sir Arthur Wellesley – June 1815 Being primarily a War of 1812 reenactor the folks I usually face across the field are the American forces, however, in 2015 I had a chance to visit Europe to join with fellow reenactors around the world to face off against the French at the 200th Anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. It seemed some of the French were coming to visit us in Canada at Old Fort Erie. I’ll admit it was strange seeing the French tri-colour flyingRead More →

Publisher, Parliamentarian, and Traitor, the strange case of Joseph Willcocks started in 1773, born in the Republic of Ireland, at the age of 27 the young man found his way to the town of York in Upper Canada. He soon found employment as the private clerk of the receiver general, Peter Russell, but it would not last, as Russell was not pleased with Willcocks’ advances towards his half-sister. But that did not stop Willcocks, who found another patron quickly in the form of the colony’s chief justice, Henry Allcock and with his influence was appointed to Home District Sheriff. However his views on the landRead More →

It ended with an explosion, but this is how it started, the sun creeping up over the historic fort, the trees, earthworks, masonry redoubts and blockhouses, tangled abatis, and rows of white tents. This was the scene early Saturday morning as near 1100 military reenactors started to crawl out of their tents and start to put on their uniforms, ready to put on a show the likes the site, or the neighborhood had ever seen. You see this year marks the 200th anniversary of the bloody siege of Fort Erie, the last major campaign on Canadian soil during the War of 1812. Sure there wasRead More →

As part of the preparation for putting the entire project into book form, I’ve been going around and re-shooting many of the fortifications that were involved in the War of 1812 using large format film (4 inch by 5 inch), simply for practice and the quality it gives. Here are the first group of forts. Completed at the start of the war to protect the dockyard at Prescott a critical point in the movement of supplies between Upper Canada, Lower Canada and Halifax, Fort Wellington was never outright attacked during the war, rather troops from the garrison would only participate in the battles of OgdensburgRead More →

As a reenactor I rarely get the chance to go out and photograph the battle demonstrations that I participate in, and pretty much never get to be out in the middle of the battle with a camera. But when fellow reenactor and friend Phil started to invite me out to his birthday tactical event at Olde Fort Erie, I thought this would be a great chance to be able to get right up close with the guys shooting. So for a couple of rounds of play I shot my trusty F3 and got right up close in the action. Because people like us are allRead More →

One of my other hobbies is reenacting the War of 1812. This largely forgotten war, expect for those who live in Canada, and the parts of the US that were touched by the conflict that ran from 1812 to early 1815. For the most part people see the battle demonstrations, the flurry of men and women dressed in red, green, and blue. The belching smoke and flame from massed musket and rifle fire, the din of the cannons. So for Week 33 I’ll give you a peek at what happens behind the scenes when we aren’t out on the field, there’s a good chance thereRead More →

One Hundred years earlier a US Ship on the Canadian Shoreline was not a good thing, but in 1913, the crew of the US Coast Guard Light Vessel 82 (LV-82) was the only thing keeping sailors on Lake Erie and their demise. In November of 1913 nature unleashed her fury a storm, known as the White Hurricane swept through the great lakes region causing a level of destruction on the lakes not seen in recent memory, and yet the crew of LV-82 stayed. Their station, Point Abino was known for the shallow shoals, and dangerous waters. Standing at their station facing 80 miles per hourRead More →

By the end of summer 1814, the jig was up for the American invasion. While they had managed to strike at the British and nearly pushed them off the Niagara peninsula again, the new commander-in-chief of the British forces in Upper Canada was going to have none of that. Following the quick movements, it all turned around at the Battle of Lundy’s Lane and General Drummond managed to push the Americans back to their beachhead at the now heavily fortified Fort Erie where the Americans had started not a month earlier. And Drummond would begin his siege that would lead up to one of theRead More →

Fort Erie, if you’ve wondered where the Ontario border town got its name, you just have to take a wander just south of old Highway Three along Lakeshore Road. Standing near the edge of the Niagara River, in the shadow of Buffalo, New York stands a small stone fort. Fort Erie was the only pre-Jay Treaty Fort that the British operated out of during the Anglo-American War of 1812, but it was also the fort that changed hands the most and only saw completion while under American occupation at the end of the war. Today it stands as one of the bloodiest battlefields on CanadianRead More →