Many fellow photographers that I know shy away from Street Photography, the idea of taking photos of another person without their permission is a bit of a polarizing topic both in and outside the photography realm. But there are many well respected and famous photographers who made their career doing that. It’s a subject I dable with on occation, mostly sticking to shorter lenses, or more unique cameras (like a Polaroid, or my Rolleiflex). A trip into Toronto to see my friend Sean’s Gallery opening gave me a chance to capture some street images, mostly on the long subway ride to and from my carRead More →

Details, Details, Details. I’ll be the first to admit that I am, hands down a sucker for ultra-wide lenses, big sweeping views and wide open spaces. I love my 14-24mm lenses, 28mm, ect. The wider the better. I was originally planning on getting a manual focus 35mm lens for this project. But then I thought to myself. Why not force myself to go back to when I was first learning photography when all I had with my Minolta SRT-102 was a 50mm lens. The AI-S Nikkor 50mm was firmly attached to my F3, to help me pay attention to something, details. Sure I can stillRead More →

Located in the shadows of condo towers, the gentle rumble of traffic along the Gardiner Expressway lays Fort York, one of the few reminders to Toronto’s colonial past as muddy York, the seat of government for Upper Canada. For those who have been following my other photography project related to the War of 1812 have already seen this particular location so I took a different spin, rather than capturing wider angle shots I focused more on the fort’s details. Fort York was established in 1793 under the orders of John Graves Simcoe, and built by the Queen’s York Rangers. In April of 1813 American shipsRead More →

Nothing says end of summer for Toronto like the Canadian National Exibition. I usually make an effort to attend on the labour day weekend to take in the airshow, saldy this year the light was horrible so my airshow photos just didn’t turn out that well. But I took a chance to wander around the grounds a little more this time around to do some street photography of the crowds and came out with some wonderful candid shots of the many people who attend the CNE! A Great overlook of the CNE midway from the Atlantis Complex at Ontario Place A big part of theRead More →

I wore a suit into Toronto for Canada Day, I was meeting up with a group of friends later on that day, but I took advantage of the beautiful weather and the bustle of the city to get some street photography in, and looking dapper there was only one choice in cameras, my Leica. I haven’t been giving my Leica love recently mostly because it’s a bit of a pain to use, bottom loading, cutting the film leader, making sure there’s enough tension so that the sprockets catch. But after some choice words I managed to load up a roll of classic Kodak Plus-X andRead More →

It was a long time coming. But the wonderful day finally arrived for two dear friends of mine. Rosemary and Jon got engaged back in 2009 and immidatly turned to me (and my trusty sidekick Wu) for their wedding photos, so I did a quick engagement photo session for the couple and then waited. The weather on the 12th was perfect, and the bride was completly aglow as she stepped into the church. It was one of the best weddings I have ever photographed (Despite the extremely short asile…and the bridesmaid (and man of honour) moved far too quickly), plus the layout of the church,Read More →

This entry I’m writing specifically for my dear friend Erin, who like me, has a love for the War of 1812. In one of her recent blog posts, she mentioned her new job at an independent children’s book publisher, Pajama Press. The book, Acts of Courage, covers the story of Laura Secord. My entry today is not on Mrs. Secord, but rather the British officer she interacted with, James FitzGibbon. FitzGibbon, not one of the first heroes of the war that one would think about, his contributions overshadowed by Laura Secord and Issac Brock. Fitzgibbon’s story blends with them both. An Irishman raised from theRead More →

A watershed event for the Canadians during the Anglo-American War of 1812. The tiny town of York, today’s Toronto, Ontario, was the colonial capital of Upper Canada, established in 1793 by John Graves Simcoe for the sole purpose of being further away from the American frontier. Despite the town’s status as the capital it was poorly regarded called Muddy York, a far cry from the seat of British power in North America, Quebec City. And while the town itself was far from a tactical target, it wasn’t a tactical target that US Army commander, Henry Dearborn, wanted following a series of American defeats in 1812.Read More →

The Church of the Holy Trinity is one of the more unique churches I have visited, next to the round church on Manitoulin Island. The reason I say this church is unique is because you don’t just walk past it on the street, you really have to seek it out. Also known as Little Trinity Church, the building is tucked rather out of the way in its own little square near the Dundas Street end of Toronto’s Eaton’s Centre. Surrounded by glass skyscrapers and the massive mall, it’s a little piece of the 19th century that’s still making it known in the city. Providing helpRead More →

Fort York, Toronto’s taste of the 19th-Century. Against all the odds this little haven of Toronto’s colonial history has survived multiple attempts to sweep it away with the Gardner Expressway and even a Streetcar line. And while it seems a little odd to find a fort this far back from the lakeshore, you have to remember that over 200 years ago the lakeshore and the area we know as Toronto was a far different place. When Sir John Graves Simcoe received his appointment as the colonial governor of Upper Canada one of his early actions saw the colonial capital, the capital at the time, Newark,Read More →