This entry I’m writing specifically for my dear friend Erin, who like me, has a love for the War of 1812. In one of her recent blog posts, she mentioned her new job at an independent children’s book publisher, Pajama Press. The book, Acts of Courage, covers the story of Laura Secord. My entry today is not on Mrs. Secord, but rather the British officer she interacted with, James FitzGibbon. FitzGibbon, not one of the first heroes of the war that one would think about, his contributions overshadowed by Laura Secord and Issac Brock. Fitzgibbon’s story blends with them both. An Irishman raised from theRead More →

A watershed event for the Canadians during the Anglo-American War of 1812. The tiny town of York, today’s Toronto, Ontario, was the colonial capital of Upper Canada, established in 1793 by John Graves Simcoe for the sole purpose of being further away from the American frontier. Despite the town’s status as the capital it was poorly regarded called Muddy York, a far cry from the seat of British power in North America, Quebec City. And while the town itself was far from a tactical target, it wasn’t a tactical target that US Army commander, Henry Dearborn, wanted following a series of American defeats in 1812.Read More →

The Church of the Holy Trinity is one of the more unique churches I have visited, next to the round church on Manitoulin Island. The reason I say this church is unique is because you don’t just walk past it on the street, you really have to seek it out. Also known as Little Trinity Church, the building is tucked rather out of the way in its own little square near the Dundas Street end of Toronto’s Eaton’s Centre. Surrounded by glass skyscrapers and the massive mall, it’s a little piece of the 19th century that’s still making it known in the city. Providing helpRead More →

Fort York, Toronto’s taste of the 19th-Century. Against all the odds this little haven of Toronto’s colonial history has survived multiple attempts to sweep it away with the Gardner Expressway and even a Streetcar line. And while it seems a little odd to find a fort this far back from the lakeshore, you have to remember that over 200 years ago the lakeshore and the area we know as Toronto was a far different place. When Sir John Graves Simcoe received his appointment as the colonial governor of Upper Canada one of his early actions saw the colonial capital, the capital at the time, Newark,Read More →

I had gotten a grand total of three hours sleep before my alarm clock woke me up. But I knew there was some strange reason I had done this to myself. So by five in the morning I was back on the road again aiming myself into Toronto. I reached Polson Pier just before six. The wind and cold was wicked that morning. My iPhone told me it was -10C. I quickly setup my camera at the edge of the pier, two huge cargo ships were busy getting loaded. But my interest was in the Toronto skyline. The sky was still dark, no sign ofRead More →

Hidden behind a hospital and a massive shopping mall a tiny road dead ends at a park. You can still see the old light standards continuing down. I had some time to kill on a Saturday afternoon so I decided to stop and check it out, having a camera with me I naturally brought it along for the hike. Down at the base of the road I was drawn out onto one the side trails that ran along a river bank, following it around I noticed something in the distance, it looked like a bridge, but not a bridge one would expect, it looked likeRead More →

The year was 1994, March. An electrical failure causes one of hte trains on Toronto Zoo’s Domain Ride to roll backwards hitting a second vehicle injuring thirty people, and forcing the Zoo to shut down the Domain Ride, ending 30 years of the ride giving tours through some of the more remote areas of the Toronto Zoo which streached well out and along the Rouge River, which visitors could not walk to. But on this cold December Saturday we were forced to. The six of us crept down the steep grade to the river banks and made our way along looking for the concrete guideway.Read More →

Week 41, or how Emily got her groove on. My original idea for this week (and one I might use later on) was to get random people in the streets to throw on some headphone and dance, but at the time I realized that might be a little creepy, so instead I called up my friend Emily who is always willing to pose for my cameras. So off into Toronto we headed with an mp3 player filled with music, a camera loaded with a roll of film, and she danced, pranced, and played around in parks, subways, and alleys. Yes we got questioning gazes, smiles,Read More →

September 10th dawned bright and clear, not too cold either. I found myself out in Clarrington, ON at the beautiful 4 Season’s Golf & Country club to photograph Sarah & Derrick’s Wedding, a couple I had photographed for their engagement photos last year. The back drop was beautiful, the sky a deep blue, the greens bright with life, the fall colours not yet starting to come in. It was such a day that I wish I had access to Kodachrome to shoot, and the colour processing to match. Sarah & Derrick were a wonderful couple to work with, both naturals in front of the camerasRead More →

I broadened my horizons, and went W I D E, and when I mean WIDE, I’m talking panoramic wide…using one of the more unique cameras in my collection. After popping into the Lomography store to get a lesson on how to use the Horizon Kompakt, a Russian swing lens camera I took once again to the streets of Toronto to give it a go. The camera itself is what makes the whole concept unique, as I mentioned earlier it is a swing lens, a fixed 28mm f/8 lens, that will travel across a 120 degree arc exposing a thin slit of the film as itRead More →