110 is back, the Film Photography Project predicted that 2012 would be the year of 110 film, and they were right. The format gained popularity through the 1970s when Kodak introduced the format based on the subminature 16mm format but in their own cartridge. My very first camera was a 110 camera that I used a grand totally of twice before it broke. So when all this hype about 110 was brewing through the FPP, I sort of shyed away from it. There are better formats in my mind. But still the question remained who would make the film? Sure FPP had found a stashRead More →

Fort Erie, if you’ve wondered where the Ontario border town got its name, you just have to take a wander just south of old Highway Three along Lakeshore Road. Standing near the edge of the Niagara River, in the shadow of Buffalo, New York stands a small stone fort. Fort Erie was the only pre-Jay Treaty Fort that the British operated out of during the Anglo-American War of 1812, but it was also the fort that changed hands the most and only saw completion while under American occupation at the end of the war. Today it stands as one of the bloodiest battlefields on CanadianRead More →

I had been putting on purchasing a flash unit for my two older Polaroid SX-70 cameras, but after hearing nothing but good things about them I decided to pick one up from Henry’s and give it a go. Designed by Mint, the flash is powered by 2 AAA batteries, and gives you a sleek modern look with the same feel as the old 10 flash bar unit that was originally offered. I have to say, I was very impressed with the unit, works on both my Rainbow Box OneStep, and my two folding SX-70s (an original model and a Sonar OneStep). It fired off everyRead More →

What do chocolate and the war of 1812 have in common; just one thing, a name, Laura Secord. Many people today hear the name Laura Secord and think of the Canadian confectionary company, but there was a hero behind that name. But unlike other heroes from the war whose names were praised right after their great victories, Laura lived in relative obscurity for decades after the war had ended. Born Laura Ingersoll on the 13th of September 1775 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, she was the eldest of four born to Thomas Ingersoll and Elizabeth Dewey. When she was eight her mother passed away, her fatherRead More →

I wore a suit into Toronto for Canada Day, I was meeting up with a group of friends later on that day, but I took advantage of the beautiful weather and the bustle of the city to get some street photography in, and looking dapper there was only one choice in cameras, my Leica. I haven’t been giving my Leica love recently mostly because it’s a bit of a pain to use, bottom loading, cutting the film leader, making sure there’s enough tension so that the sprockets catch. But after some choice words I managed to load up a roll of classic Kodak Plus-X andRead More →

Fort Wellington is one of the many forts that helped defend Upper Canada during the War of 1812, but unlike many other forts of the era, Fort Wellington never saw a direct attack. By 1810 the small village of Prescott had been founded along the shores of the St. Lawrence River and the King’s Highway which ran between Montreal, Kingston, and York (Toronto). Prescott soon found importance in travel along the St. Lawrence as bateaux from Montreal, used to navigate the rapids, would be offloaded onto the larger lake freighters to continue onto Kingston, York, and the Niagara region. Fort Wellington is one of aRead More →

So what do tractors and a never completed nuclear power station have in common? Well nothing really…except in the case of a small station somewhere in the volunteer state, better known as Tennessee. The power station was one of many that were planned by the TVA through the 1970s to bring clean, efficiant power to the southern United States. Of course as a student of history there were several accidents in the 1980s that really turned the world view on nuclear power in a negitive light. Chernobyl in the former USSR and the Three Mile Island incident in the United States. Then there was theRead More →

The first of many posts about the amazing mid-summer meetup I attended in northern Michigan. The event is called Photostock and hosted/organized by world renowned photographer Bill Schwab, who despite his world renownedness is a really cool down to earth humble guy who just wants to get other photographers inspired. And inspire me it did, to get back into the chemicals and restart developing my own black and white film, and to print…printing will come later, but I did find a place nearby that has rentable darkrooms so I will be printing again soon! But anyways, first, more Photostock. The event is held in theRead More →

Often I will use this blog as a forum for my own photography, but today, today is special as I will feature the photos of others. Today is June 6th, and what sets today out from the other days in this case. Because on June 6th, 1944 saw the start of the end, today is D-Day. Europe was a fortress at this point, the Nazi regieme had rolled over the entire place annexing and occupying territories, and terrorizing the world. But 6:30am, June 6th, 1944 saw the start of the end, Operation Overlord was the hammer that would smash open Fortress Europe. So today, IRead More →

Sometimes you just look up and see your first camera sitting there, the lens still shining as if new, and it begs you to be used. Well that happened recently, my very first camera, religated to my third shelf (were I place seldom used cameras, ones that work but have something off with them, or just cannot get the film anymore…), the Minolta Hi-Matic 7s, a five dollar garage sale find. All mechanical, the battery for the light meter long dead, but everything still works. So I dicided to take it out for a trip. Because I can. Minolta Hi-Matic 7s – Rokkor-PF 45mm 1:1.7Read More →